Effects of early-life diet on Nucella canaliculata drilling phenotype quantified in the laboratory after rearing on different prey treatments

Alternative Title
Date Created
2024-01-24
Location
Northeast Pacific coast; California and Oregon, USA
westlimit: -123.078; southlimit: 36.4476; eastlimit: -121.929; northlimit: 38.3235
DOI
10.26008/1912/bco-dmo.918460.1
Related Materials
Replaces
Replaced By
Keywords
Eco-evolutionary Dynamics
Nucella canaliculata
selection
Abstract
The growing field of eco-evolutionary dynamics has highlighted the importance of reciprocal feedbacks between evolutionary and ecological processes. We tested whether selection could act on existing within-population variation in a predatory trait in the marine dogwhelk, Nucella canaliculata. We reared newly hatched dogwhelks on four prey treatments (thin-shelled Mytilus trossulus, two treatments of M. californianus from two populations known to differ in adult shell thickness, and acorn barnacles). To quantify dogwhelk phenotype, we tested the surviving adult dogwhelks on their ability to drill mid-sized (5-7cm long) M. californianus. We found evidence that dogwhelk phenotype varied among the early-life diet treatments. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/918460
Description
Dataset: Effects of early-life diet on Nucella canaliculata drilling phenotype
Embargo Date
Citation
Cruises
Cruise ID
Cruise DOI
Vessel Name
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution 4.0