Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office Data Sets

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The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) was created to serve PIs funded by the NSF Biological and Chemical Oceanography Sections as a location where marine biogeochemical, ecological and oceanographic data and information developed in the course of scientific research can easily be disseminated, protected, and stored on short and intermediate time-frames. Our main objective is to support the scientific community through improved access to ocean science data.

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  • Dataset
    Results from predation assays (squidpops) conducted along rocky reefs of the Western coast of San Cristobal, Galapagos from June to November 2021 to determine fish predation intensity across a spatial and temporal temperature gradient
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-17) Bruno, John
    This dataset contains results from predation assays (squidpops) to determine fish predation intensity across a spatial and temporal gradient of temperature. Assays were conducted between June and November 2021 at six locations of rocky reefs along the Western coast of San Cristobal, the eastern Island of the Galapagos Archipelago. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/894249
  • Dataset
    Results from mesocosm experiments measuring how temperature affects predation rates by whelks on barnacles
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-17) Bruno, John
    These data contain results from mesocosm experiments measuring how temperature affects predation rates by whelks on barnacles. These results include barnacles eaten and whelk movements under warm and cold conditions. The experiments were done in the Galapagos Science Center in San Cristobal, Galapagos. Estimates of how temperature modifies activity and predation rates will help understand and predict changes in marine communities under future climate change scenarios. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/894148
  • Dataset
    RR2311 bottle data from R/V Roger Revelle cruise RR2311 in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific from November to December 2023
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-17) Ward, Bess B.
    This dataset includes the Niskin bottle data collected on R/V Roger Revelle cruise RR2311 in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific, off the coast of Chile and Peru, from November to December 2023. Data were processed with Seasave V 7.26.7.121. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/924943
  • Dataset
    Suspended particle total mercury and monomethylmercury in the California Current Ecosystem (CCE) determined from samples collected on R/V Roger Revelle cruise RR2105 (P2107) in July to August 2021
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-14) Cui, Xinyun ; Adams, Hannah M. ; Schartup, Amina T. ; Lamborg, Carl
    This dataset includes concentrations of suspended particulate total mercury and monomethylmercury from 8 upwelling stations and 5 offshore stations (13 stations in total, 2-4 depths per station), during the 2021 CCE LTER Process Cruise (P2107), from July 17th to Aug 9th. Suspended particle samples (1 and 51 micrometers (µm)) were collected with a multiple-unit large-volume in situ filtration system. Sampling depths were from the surface (10 meters) to the deep ocean as deep as 1000 meters. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/926959
  • Dataset
    Dissolved mercury (Hg) speciation in the California Current System from samples collected on R/V Roger Revelle cruise RR2105 in July to August 2021
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-14) Adams, Hannah M. ; Schartup, Amina T. ; Lamborg, Carl ; Cui, Xinyun
    Monomethylmercury (MMHg) is a neurotoxicant that biomagnifies in marine food webs, reaching high concentrations in apex predators. To predict changes in oceanic MMHg concentrations, it is important to quantify its sources and sinks. Here, we study mercury speciation in the California Current System through cruise sampling and modeling. Previous work in the California Current System has found that upwelling impacts mercury biogeochemistry by transporting mercury-enriched deep waters to productive surface waters. These upwelled waters originate within the California Undercurrent water mass and are subsequently advected as a surface water parcel to the California Current. By comparing the two major water masses, we find that the California Undercurrent contains elevated dissolved total mercury (Hg) and Dimethylmercury (DMHg) concentrations by 57% and 60%, respectively, compared to the California Current. We explain that these differences result from losses during advection, specifically scavenging and DMHg demethylation. We calculate a net DMHg demethylation rate constant of 1.8 ± 0.9% per day; and build an empirically constrained mass budget model to demonstrate that DMHg demethylation accounts for 59% of surface MMHg sources. These findings illustrate that DMHg is a significant source of MMHg in this region, challenging the current understanding of the major sources of marine MMHg. These data are associated with Adams et al., 2024 (doi: 10.21203/rs.3.rs-3909481/v1). For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/926873
  • Dataset
    Community composition of corals in Palau determined by quantitative transects sampled in April 2023
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-13) Meyer-Kaiser, Kirstin
    Bottlenecks in the early life-history stages of corals can shape community composition across reefs. We used photographic surveys and the deployment of tiles to capture recruit, juvenile, and adult corals at 7 sites across Palau. Photographic surveys were undertaken using two methods: a qualitative biodiversity survey (2021–2022) and quantitative transects (2023). This dataset includes the results from the quantitative transects. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/926379
  • Dataset
    Community composition of corals in Palau determined by a qualitative survey conducted in 2021-2022
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-13) Meyer-Kaiser, Kirstin
    Bottlenecks in the early life-history stages of corals can shape community composition across reefs. We used photographic surveys and the deployment of tiles to capture recruit, juvenile, and adult corals at 7 sites across Palau. Photographic surveys were undertaken using two methods: a qualitative biodiversity survey (2021–2022) and quantitative transects (2023). This dataset includes the results from the biodiversity survey. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/927230
  • Dataset
    Water temperature measured at six coral reefs sites in Palau from 2021 to 2023
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-13) Meyer-Kaiser, Kirstin
    Water temperature was measured at six coral reef sites in Palau from 2021 to 2023. Loggers (Hobo Tidbit) were attached to threaded rods embedded in the reef using zip ties. Water temperature was measured every 30 minutes. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/926498
  • Dataset
    Light level (lux) measured at six coral reefs sites in Palau from 2021 to 2023
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-13) Meyer-Kaiser, Kirstin
    Light levels (lux) were measured at six coral reef sites in Palau during field seasons from 2021 to 2023. Loggers (Hobo Pendant, UA-002-64) were attached to threaded rods embedded in the reef using zip ties. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/926465
  • Dataset
    Fertilization success rates from gamete age assays using eggs and sperm from Porites lobata corals in April-May 2023
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-13) Meyer-Kaiser, Kirstin
    This dataset includes fertilization success rates from gamete age assays using eggs and sperm from Porites lobata corals in April-May 2023. Porites lobata colonies were collected from study sites in the Rock Islands Southern Lagoon in the Republic of Palau. Colonies were isolated in individual plastic containers at the Palau International Coral Reef Center. Sperm from selected male colonies were pooled in a single container, and eggs were gently poured into this pool, allowing fertilization to commence. Fertilization success was evaluated visually 2-3 hours after fertilization began by observing a sub-sample of the eggs from each cross under a dissecting microscope and counting whole (undivided) eggs and dividing embryos. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/926315
  • Dataset
    Neocalanus distribution, mean length, mean weight, abundance and biomass from the Gulf of Alaska , Fall 2015, 2016 and 2017
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-10) Hopcroft, Russell R. ; Lenz, Petra H.
    Neocalanus distribution, mean length, mean weight, abundance and biomass from the Gulf of Alaska, Fall 2015, 2016 and 2017 For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/852896
  • Dataset
    Dissolved organic matter sulfur and carbon analysis of samples collected between 2010 and 2021 from various locations globally
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-10) Phillips, Alexandra ; Sessions, Alex
    The following dataset of SPE (solid phase extracted) DOM (dissolved organic matter) accompanies Phillips et al. 2022 (doi: 10.1073/pnas.2209152119). Our project sought to address the question of where long-lived organic molecules that are dissolved in the oceans come from, in particular molecules containing sulfur (S). Our approach was to measure the relative abundance of two stable sulfur isotopes (S-32 and S-34) in these molecules, which is technically very difficult due to the presence of million-fold higher sulfate ions in seawater. We developed a new preparatory chemistry to adequately isolate these organic molecules, and a new elemental analyzer/mass spectrometry method to measure their isotope abundances with high precision at trace levels. We conducted these S isotope measurements on 100 samples of dissolved organic matter (DOM) that had been previously collected by our collaborators from around the world (Northeast Pacific oxygen minimum zone, Northeast Pacific Shelf, North Pacific Gyre, San Pedro Basin, Caeté Estuary, South Pacific Gyre, and the North Sea). We also collected 2 dozen new samples from oceanographic stations in the North Pacific Gyre (Hawaii Ocean Timeseries) and North Atlantic Gyre (Bermuda Atlantic Time Series). The dataset includes 1) sample information such as sample ID, sample location, station name, collection depth (ranging from 0 to 4800 meters), latitude and longitude, month and year sampled (ranging from 2010 to 2021); 2) elemental analysis such as sulfur isotope values (δ34S), carbon (C) isotope values (δ13C), and C:S molar ratios; 3) physical parameters from collaborators' CTD analysis, such as oxygen, salinity, fluorescence, and temperature; and 4) chemical data from collaborators such as dissolved nitrate, phosphate, silicate, and calculated DOC (dissolved organic carbon) and DOS (dissolved organic sulfur) concentrations. Our data show that DOM molecules have (34S/32S) isotope ratios that are entirely consistent with being formed from ocean sulfate, and inconsistent with being formed by reactions of hydrogen sulfide in anoxic porewaters. This result negates one of the leading hypotheses for how long-lived DOM forms, i.e. by reactions in anoxic sediments. Instead, this sharpens our focus on understanding how relatively short-lived biomolecules in the surface ocean are transformed into long-lived DOM molecules. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/927046
  • Dataset
    Particulate Carbon Concentrations and Stable Carbon Isotopes in Marine Particles Captured by In Situ Mclane Pumps at Cocos Ridge Coco Ridge (Eastern Equatorial Pacific) during cruise SR2113 between November - December 2021
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-10) Dong, Sijia ; Pavia, Frank J. ; Berelson, William M. ; Adkins, Jess F.
    This dataset includes particulate carbon concentrations and isotopes collected in December, 2021. Suspended particles are collected at 4 different stations near Cocos Ridge, at two different size fractions using Mclane pumps. The two size fractions are large size fraction (LSF) that is >51 um, and small size fraction (SSF) that is 0.5 -- 51 um. Concentrations and stable carbon isotopes of particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) and total carbon (TC) are measured and reported. PIC content are measured by acidifying a subsample of the Glass Fiber Filter (GFF) and measuring total CO2 released using a Picarro Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy. TC content are analyzed by burning a subsample of the GFF on Elemental Analyzer (EA). Samples were collected during SR2113 onboard Sally Ride, under the project "new approaches to study calcium carbonate dissolution on the sea floor and its impact on paleo-proxy interpretations", as a water-column side determination of particle compositions and carbonate dissolution. This data reveals changes in concentrations and stable carbon isotopes with water depth, and has implications for multiple biogeochemical processes associated with both the inorganic and the organic carbon within marine particles in the water column. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/925258
  • Dataset
    Compound specific isotope data of amino acids for abyssal macrofauna, megafauna, sediments, sediment traps, and in situ filtered particles at Station ALOHA off Hawaii and Station M off California from 2019 to 2020
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-09) Drazen, Jeffrey C. ; Popp, Brian N.
    This dataset includes compound specific isotope data of amino acids for abyssal macrofauna, megafauna, sediments, sediment traps, and in situ filtered particles from off California (Station M) and Hawaii (Station ALOHA) collected from 2019 to 2020. These data were collected as part of a food web project to evaluate the relative importance of small and large particle types to abyssal communities. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/922789
  • Dataset
    Capture records of abyssal megafauna captured using submersibles and ROVs at Station ALOHA off Hawaii and Station M off California from 2019 to 2020
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-09) Drazen, Jeffrey C.
    This dataset includes the capture records for the abyssal megafauna captured as part of this food web project. Megafauna were captured using submersibles and ROVs at Station ALOHA off Hawaii and Station M off California from 2019 to 2020. These animals were captured as representatives of their abyssal food webs for an isotopic investigation of their original particulate nutritional sources (different sized particles). Each organism was identified, measured, most weighed using a motion compensated scale, and frozen for later drying and isotope analysis. For larger organisms such as holothurians or fishes, samples of tissues were taken and often the whole animal was preserved for later confirmation of taxonomic identification. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/922718
  • Dataset
    Data and analysis code used to experimentally evolve representatives of four phytoplankton functional types in co-culture with a heterotrophic bacterium under either present-day or predicted future pCO2 conditions
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-06) Morris, James Jeffrey ; Entwistle, Elizabeth ; Lu, Zhiying
    The CO2 content of Earth's atmosphere is rapidly increasing due to human consumption of fossil fuels. Models based on short-term culture experiments predict that major changes will occur in marine phytoplankton communities in the future ocean, but these models rarely consider how the evolutionary potential of phytoplankton or interactions within marine microbial communities may influence these changes. Here we experimentally evolved representatives of four phytoplankton functional types (silicifiers, calcifiers, coastal cyanobacteria, and oligotrophic cyanobacteria) in co-culture with a heterotrophic bacterium, Alteromonas, under either present-day or predicted future pCO2 conditions. The data and analysis code in this dataset show that the genomes of all four phytoplankton as well as Alteromonas evolved over the course of the experiment. Mutations in oxidative stress related genes (PTOX and thioredoxin reductase) were ubiquitous in evolved cultures of Prochlorococcus, suggesting adaptation in response to the well-studied deficiencies of this genus in terms of stress resistance in culture. With the exception of Prochlorococcus, most phytoplankton genomes appeared to experience mostly purifying selection, but Alteromonas genomes showed strong evidence of directional selection, particularly in co-culture with eukaryotic phytoplankton. Metabolic pathways were under intense selection for Alteromonas, and in particular adaptation to co-culture with eukaryotes appeared to select for a shift from growth on organic acids using an abbreviated TCA cycle to growth on more complex substrates using the complete TCA cycle. This work provides new insights on how phytoplankton will respond to anthropogenic change and on the evolutionary mechanisms governing the structure and function of marine microbial communities. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/925872
  • Dataset
    Data and code from an examination of growth rates of cyanobacteria co-cultured with a heterotrophic bacterium, Alteromonas, under either present-day or predicted future pCO2 conditions
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-06) Morris, James Jeffrey ; Entwistle, Elizabeth ; Lu, Zhiying
    The CO2 content of Earth's atmosphere is rapidly increasing due to human consumption of fossil fuels. Models based on short-term culture experiments predict that major changes will occur in marine phytoplankton communities in the future ocean, but these models rarely consider how the evolutionary potential of phytoplankton or interactions within marine microbial communities may influence these changes. Here we experimentally evolved representatives of four phytoplankton functional types (silicifiers, calcifiers, coastal cyanobacteria, and oligotrophic cyanobacteria) in co-culture with a heterotrophic bacterium, Alteromonas, under either present-day or predicted future pCO2 conditions. The data and analysis code in this dataset show that the growth rates of cyanobacteria generally increased under both conditions, and the growth defects observed in ancestral Prochlorococcus cultures at elevated pCO2 and in axenic culture were diminished after evolution. Evolved Alteromonas were also poorer "helpers" for Prochlorococcus, supporting the assertion that the interaction between Prochlorococcus and heterotrophic bacteria is not a true mutualism but rather a competitive interaction stabilized by Black Queen processes. This work provides new insights on how phytoplankton will respond to anthropogenic change and on the evolutionary mechanisms governing the structure and function of marine microbial communities. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/925841
  • Dataset
    Benthic survey of Looe Key and Wonderland Reef conducted in 10-15 December 2023
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-02) Bartley, Michaela M. ; Fiore, Cara L. ; Apprill, Amy ; Easson, Cole G. ; Reigel, Alicia M.
    The benthic survey of Looe Key and Wonderland Reef was conducted by using a 100 m transect underwater above the reef. Species were identified and recorded every 10 cm on the transect. This created a transect with 100 points, which was then converted into percent cover of benthic species. The data recorded from the transects was compiled and analyzed to determine which reef has a higher density of sponges, and which reef has a higher density of coral. Four of the five surveys were conducted in Looe Key, and one survey was conducted in Wonderland Reef. Each survey included three separate transects. Wonderland Reef has about twice the percent cover of sponges (~31%), while Looe Key Reef has ~15.6% sponge cover. The percent cover of stony corals, octocorals, and hard substrate were similar at the two sites whilst Looe Key maintained a higher cover of palythoa (an invasive zoanthid) than Wonderland Reef. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/907661
  • Dataset
    Surface water and N.digitalis inhalent/exhalent water sample nutrient and bacterioplankton metadata of Looe Key and Wonderland Reef conducted in 10-15 December 2023
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-02) Bartley, Michaela M. ; Fiore, Cara L. ; Apprill, Amy ; Easson, Cole G. ; Reigel, Alicia M. ; Crump, Nile
    Sponges are sessile filter-feeders that can process vast amounts of water and are known to influence the chemistry of the surrounding seawater. In areas where sponges are abundant, there may be a unique nutrient profile or ‘reef signal’ produced by the metabolism of the reef benthic community and sponges may contribute significantly to this ‘signal’. This work provides an initial test of such a hypothesis, specifically that sponges can influence the dissolved nutrient profile in the overlying seawater. We analyzed differences in dissolved nutrient concentration (total organic carbon and dissolved nitrogen, inorganic nutrients, fluorescent dissolved organic matter (fDOM), and metabolites) and bacterioplankton cell density in surface seawater between two Florida Key coral reefs with different benthic communities. Additionally, we analyzed the processing of these nutrients by one species of sponge, Niphates digitalis, observed at both sites. While picoplankton abundances and inorganic nutrients were not different between sites, the surface water at Wonderland reef was characterized by elevated humic-like fDOM components and concentrations of certain metabolites such as aromatic amino acids relative to Looe Key. There is also higher similarity in the metabolite profile between Looe Key reef and Wonderland reef compared to the surface water away from the reef. There was not corresponding net production of the quantified metabolites by N. digitalis and overall little processing of dissolved organic nutrients by this sponge species. These results provide initial support for a ‘reef signal’ in metabolite profiles and there may be an impact of sponge abundance on the nutrient profile at Wonderland. However, the sponge N. digitalis is likely not a major contributor to the dissolved organic nutrient pool. Overall, these results have implications for better understanding the influence of the benthic community on coral reef nutrient dynamics. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/907559
  • Dataset
    Synechococcus batch culture data (cell quotas and ratios (C,N,P), size, and diameter) from laboratory experiments in 2021 to 2022 with related isolates cultured across a range of temperatures (16-25C)
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2024-05-02) Harcourt, Renne ; Garcia, Nathan S. ; Martiny, Adam
    Diverse phytoplankton modulate the coupling between the ocean carbon and nutrient cycles through life-history traits such as cell size, elemental quotas, and ratios. Biodiversity is mostly considered at broad functional levels, but major phytoplankton lineages are themselves highly diverse. As an example, Synechococcus is found in nearly all ocean regions, and we demonstrate contains extensive intraspecific variation. Here, we grew four closely related Synechococcus isolates in serially transferred cultures across a range of temperatures (16-25°C) to quantify for the relative role of intraspecific trait variation vs. environmental change. We collected data at the time of sampling, after cultures grew for seven doublings or one month. Experiments were conducted from September of 2021 to early 2022. This dataset includes cell quotas (fmol) for carbon (QC), nitrogen (QN), and phosphorus (QP). It also includes N:P, C:N, and C:P stoichiometry, cell size, and cell diameter (µm) for each Synechococcus strain and clade under each thermal condition. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/926311