Kirincich Anthony R.

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Last Name
Kirincich
First Name
Anthony R.
ORCID
0000-0001-7954-8543

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Now showing 1 - 20 of 132
  • Dataset
    April-June 2018 Lidar raw data
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2018) Kirincich, Anthony R.
    This zipped content contains Lidar raw data: Raw 10-minute files of 1 Hz data files from 53-200m amsl from April-June 2018.
  • Dataset
    Meteorological tower daily data 2020
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2020) Kirincich, Anthony R.
    Meteorological tower daily data for 2020
  • Other
    Lidar validation report July 2020
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2020-07) Kirincich, Anthony R.
    Performance Verification Certificate for Renewable NRG Systems reference Lidar: WLS7-94 on July 2020.
  • Dataset
    Meteorological tower monthly summary data for 2021
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2021) Kirincich, Anthony R. ; Cinquino, Eve
    Meteorological tower monthly summary data for 2021
  • Other
    Lidar Metadata Nantucket
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2023-02-08) Kirincich, Anthony R. ; Cinquino, Eve
    This data was collected by Kirincich and Cinquino as part of a Metocean monitoring campaign sponsored by the National Offshore Wind Research and Development Consortium (NOWRDC). The campaign was designed to observe key atmospheric parameters at a land based site in the proximity of the Massachusetts and Rhode Island Wind Energy Areas for one year. This is part of a longer term effort to collect atmospheric and oceanic data at an existing offshore platform in the vicinity, which can be found here https://darchive.mblwhoilibrary.org/handle/1912/27014. The campaign supported the purchase and installation of a LIDAR wind profiler at the Nantucket Test Site (NTS). This instrument was installed and operated by WHOI and validated by UL-AWS Truepower following a MetOcean Measurement Plan created by UL-AWST, WHOI, and NOWRDC. The LIDAR was installed at the NTS in November 2021 and operated continuously, as possible, through the end of 2023.
  • Other
    Lidar validation report August 2016
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2016-08) Kirincich, Anthony R.
    Performance Verification Certificate for Renewable NRG Systems reference Lidar: WLS7-94 on August 2016.
  • Article
    The summer heat balance of the Oregon inner shelf over two decades: mean and interannual variability
    (American Geophysical Union, 2020-01-24) Lemagie, Emily ; Kirincich, Anthony R. ; Lentz, Steven J.
    Summer temperature and velocity measurements from 14 years in 15 m of water over the inner shelf off Oregon were used to investigate interannual temperature variability and the capacity of the across‐shelf heat flux to buffer net surface warming. There was no observable trend in summer mean temperatures, and the standard deviation of interannual variability (0.5°C) was less than the standard deviation in daily temperatures each summer (1.6°C, on average). Yet net surface heat flux provided a nearly constant source of heat each year, with a standard deviation less than 15 urn:x-wiley:jgrc:media:jgrc23812:jgrc23812-math-0001 of the interannual mean. The summer mean across‐shelf upwelling circulation advected warmer water offshore near the surface, cooling the inner shelf and buffering the surface warming. In most years (11 out of 14), this two‐dimensional heat budget roughly closed with a residual less than 20 urn:x-wiley:jgrc:media:jgrc23812:jgrc23812-math-0002 of the leading term. Even in years when the heat budget did not balance, the observed temperature change was negligible, indicating that an additional source of cooling was needed to close the budget. A comparison of the residual to the interannual variability in fields such as along‐shelf wind stress, stratification, and along‐shelf currents found no significant correlation, and further investigation into the intraseasonal dynamics is recommended to explain the results. An improved understanding of the processes that contribute to warming or cooling of the coastal ocean has the potential to improve predictions of the impact of year‐to‐year changes in local winds and circulation, such as from marine heat waves or climate change, on coastal temperatures.
  • Dataset
    October-December 2021 Lidar raw data
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2021) Kirincich, Anthony R. ; Cinquino, Eve
    This zipped content contains Lidar raw data: Raw 10-minute files of 1 Hz data files from 53-200m amsl from October-December 2021.
  • Dataset
    Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory 2021
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2022-06-24) Cinquino, Eve ; Batchelder, Sidney ; Fredericks, Janet J. ; Sisson, John D. ; Faluotico, Stephen M. ; Popenoe, Hugh ; Sandwith, Zoe O. ; Crockford, E. Taylor ; Peacock, Emily E. ; Shalapyonok, Alexi ; Sosik, Heidi M. ; Kirincich, Anthony R. ; Edson, James B. ; Trowbridge, John H.
    Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO) is a leading research and engineering facility operated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. MVCO has been collecting ocean and atmospheric data at 3 sites on and near Martha's Vineyard since 2001. A meteorological mast (met mast) on South Beach in Edgartown, MA has collected atmospheric data since May 31 2001. An Air Sea Interaction Tower (ASIT) has been collecting atmospheric and subsurface oceanic data since August 5, 2004. A seafloor node (12m node) has been collecting oceanic data from the seafloor since June 14, 2001. This dataset encompasses the core data (wind speed and direction, air pressure, temperature and relative humidity, water temperature and salinity, and wave data) that has been collected during this period. To learn more about the facility and see additional data collected during short term deployments, visit the MVCO Website (https://mvco.whoi.edu/).
  • Dataset
    2018 Lidar summary data
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2018) Kirincich, Anthony R.
    This zipped content contains Lidar summary data: Daily 10-minute average files from 53-200m amsl for 2018.
  • Article
    Search and rescue at sea aided by hidden flow structures
    (Nature Communications, 2020-05-26) Serra, Mattia ; Sathe, Pratik ; Rypina, Irina I. ; Kirincich, Anthony R. ; Ross, Shane D. ; Lermusiaux, Pierre F. J. ; Allen, Arthur ; Peacock, Thomas ; Haller, George
    Every year, hundreds of people die at sea because of vessel and airplane accidents. A key challenge in reducing the number of these fatalities is to make Search and Rescue (SAR) algorithms more efficient. Here, we address this challenge by uncovering hidden TRansient Attracting Profiles (TRAPs) in ocean-surface velocity data. Computable from a single velocity-field snapshot, TRAPs act as short-term attractors for all floating objects. In three different ocean field experiments, we show that TRAPs computed from measured as well as modeled velocities attract deployed drifters and manikins emulating people fallen in the water. TRAPs, which remain hidden to prior flow diagnostics, thus provide critical information for hazard responses, such as SAR and oil spill containment, and hence have the potential to save lives and limit environmental disasters.
  • Dataset
    January-March 2021 Lidar raw data
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2021) Kirincich, Anthony R.
    This zipped content contains Lidar raw data: Raw 10-minute files of 1 Hz data files from 53-200m amsl from January-March 2021.
  • Other
    Meteorological Metadata
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2021-09-13) Kirincich, Anthony R.
    This data was collected by a team led by Kirincich as part of a Metocean monitoring campaign sponsored by the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC). The campaign was designed to observe key atmospheric and ocean parameters at an existing offshore platform in the proximity of the Massachusetts and Rhode Island Wind Energy Areas. The campaign supported the purchase and installation of a LIDAR wind profiler, two cup anemometers and a wind direction vane at the MVCO Air-Sea Interaction Tower (ASIT). These instruments were installed and operated by WHOI and validated by UL-AWS Truepower following a MetOcean Measurement Plan created by UL-AWST, WHOI, and the MassCEC. All instruments were installed on WHOI's offshore tower in the fall of 2016 and operated continuously, as possible, through the end of 2020. After this time the project transitioned to become the MetOcean Reference Site (MORS-1), supported by the National Offshore Wind Research and Development Consortium (NOWRDC).
  • Dataset
    Meteorological tower daily data 2016
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2016) Kirincich, Anthony R.
    Meteorological tower summary data for 2016
  • Article
    Some considerations about coastal ocean observing systems
    (Sears Foundation for Marine Research, 2017-05-01) Brink, Kenneth H. ; Kirincich, Anthony R.
    Coastal ocean observing capabilities are evolving rapidly, both in terms of sensors and in terms of the volume of information available. We discuss the aspects of the coastal ocean that make it a unique environment, both in terms of physical processes and measurement techniques. Although many global-level systems are relevant to the coastal ocean, we concentrate on treating systems that are unique to the continental shelf environment. Further, we briefly discuss examples of measurement systems that would be useful for developing and driving ocean prediction systems.
  • Other
    Commissioning form: Windcube V2 WLS7-436 WHOI ASIT Tower
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2017-03-10) Kirincich, Anthony R.
    Lidar is deployed on the Air Sea Interaction Tower (ASIT) offshore structure owned and operated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI); Tower is approximately 2 miles south of Martha’s Vineyard, MA. Station has a walking platform at approximately 11 m MSL, with a section of lattice mast that extends from the platform to approximately 21 m MSL. The walking platform has a “diving board” extension oriented southwest, on which the lidar is deployed. The lidar sits upon a work bench mounted outboard of the southeast side of the diving board. Figure 1 illustrates the site configuration Aside from the immediate structure, the closest obstruction is Martha’s vineyard. Open ocean fetch for the southern half of the compass; Site access controlled by WHOI; additional site details attached separately.
  • Dataset
    October-December 2017 Lidar raw data
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2017) Kirincich, Anthony R.
    This zipped content contains Lidar raw data: Raw 10-minute files of 1 Hz data files from 53-200m amsl from October-December 2017.
  • Dataset
    2019 Lidar summary data
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2019) Kirincich, Anthony R.
    This zipped content contains Lidar summary data: Daily 10-minute average files from 53-200m amsl for 2019.
  • Dataset
    Meteorological tower daily data 2017
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2017) Kirincich, Anthony R.
    Meteorological tower summary data for 2017
  • Dataset
    Meteorological tower monthly summary data 2017
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2017) Kirincich, Anthony R.
    Meteorological tower monthly summary data for 2017