Joye Samantha B.

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Joye
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Samantha B.
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  • Article
    Environmental factors shaping bacterial, archaeal and fungal community structure in hydrothermal sediments of Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California
    (Public Library of Science, 2021-09-08) Ramírez, Gustavo A. ; Mara, Paraskevi ; Sehein, Taylor R. ; Wegener, Gunter ; Chambers, Christopher R. ; Joye, Samantha B. ; Peterson, Richard N. ; Philippe, Aurélie ; Burgaud, Gaëtan ; Edgcomb, Virginia P. ; Teske, Andreas P.
    The flanking regions of Guaymas Basin, a young marginal rift basin located in the Gulf of California, are covered with thick sediment layers that are hydrothermally altered due to magmatic intrusions. To explore environmental controls on microbial community structure in this complex environment, we analyzed site- and depth-related patterns of microbial community composition (bacteria, archaea, and fungi) in hydrothermally influenced sediments with different thermal conditions, geochemical regimes, and extent of microbial mats. We compared communities in hot hydrothermal sediments (75-100°C at ~40 cm depth) covered by orange-pigmented Beggiatoaceae mats in the Cathedral Hill area, temperate sediments (25-30°C at ~40 cm depth) covered by yellow sulfur precipitates and filamentous sulfur oxidizers at the Aceto Balsamico location, hot sediments (>115°C at ~40 cm depth) with orange-pigmented mats surrounded by yellow and white mats at the Marker 14 location, and background, non-hydrothermal sediments (3.8°C at ~45 cm depth) overlain with ambient seawater. Whereas bacterial and archaeal communities are clearly structured by site-specific in-situ thermal gradients and geochemical conditions, fungal communities are generally structured by sediment depth. Unexpectedly, chytrid sequence biosignatures are ubiquitous in surficial sediments whereas deeper sediments contain diverse yeasts and filamentous fungi. In correlation analyses across different sites and sediment depths, fungal phylotypes correlate to each other to a much greater degree than Bacteria and Archaea do to each other or to fungi, further substantiating that site-specific in-situ thermal gradients and geochemical conditions that control bacteria and archaea do not extend to fungi.
  • Article
    Ideas and perspectives: a strategic assessment of methane and nitrous oxide measurements in the marine environment
    (European Geosciences Union, 2020-11-26) Wilson, Samuel T. ; Al-Haj, Alia N. ; Bourbonnais, Annie ; Frey, Claudia ; Fulweiler, Robinson W. ; Kessler, John D. ; Marchant, Hannah K. ; Milucka, Jana ; Ray, Nicholas E. ; Suntharalingam, Parvadha ; Thornton, Brett F. ; Upstill-Goddard, Robert C. ; Weber, Thomas S. ; Arévalo-Martínez, Damian L. ; Bange, Hermann W. ; Benway, Heather M. ; Bianchi, Daniele ; Borges, Alberto V. ; Chang, Bonnie X. ; Crill, Patrick M. ; del Valle, Daniela A. ; Farías, Laura ; Joye, Samantha B. ; Kock, Annette ; Labidi, Jabrane ; Manning, Cara C. ; Pohlman, John W. ; Rehder, Gregor ; Sparrow, Katy J. ; Tortell, Philippe D. ; Treude, Tina ; Valentine, David L. ; Ward, Bess B. ; Yang, Simon ; Yurganov, Leonid N.
    In the current era of rapid climate change, accurate characterization of climate-relevant gas dynamics – namely production, consumption, and net emissions – is required for all biomes, especially those ecosystems most susceptible to the impact of change. Marine environments include regions that act as net sources or sinks for numerous climate-active trace gases including methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). The temporal and spatial distributions of CH4 and N2O are controlled by the interaction of complex biogeochemical and physical processes. To evaluate and quantify how these mechanisms affect marine CH4 and N2O cycling requires a combination of traditional scientific disciplines including oceanography, microbiology, and numerical modeling. Fundamental to these efforts is ensuring that the datasets produced by independent scientists are comparable and interoperable. Equally critical is transparent communication within the research community about the technical improvements required to increase our collective understanding of marine CH4 and N2O. A workshop sponsored by Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB) was organized to enhance dialogue and collaborations pertaining to marine CH4 and N2O. Here, we summarize the outcomes from the workshop to describe the challenges and opportunities for near-future CH4 and N2O research in the marine environment.
  • Article
    Microbial communities under distinct thermal and geochemical regimes in axial and off-axis sediments of Guaymas Basin
    (Frontiers Media, 2021-02-12) Teske, Andreas P. ; Wegener, Gunter ; Chanton, Jeffrey P. ; White, Dylan ; MacGregor, Barbara J. ; Hoer, Daniel ; de Beer, Dirk ; Zhuang, Guangchao ; Saxton, Matthew A. ; Joye, Samantha B. ; Lizarralde, Daniel ; Soule, S. Adam ; Ruff, S. Emil
    Cold seeps and hydrothermal vents are seafloor habitats fueled by subsurface energy sources. Both habitat types coexist in Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California, providing an opportunity to compare microbial communities with distinct physiologies adapted to different thermal regimes. Hydrothermally active sites in the southern Guaymas Basin axial valley, and cold seep sites at Octopus Mound, a carbonate mound with abundant methanotrophic cold seep fauna at the Central Seep location on the northern off-axis flanking regions, show consistent geochemical and microbial differences between hot, temperate, cold seep, and background sites. The changing microbial actors include autotrophic and heterotrophic bacterial and archaeal lineages that catalyze sulfur, nitrogen, and methane cycling, organic matter degradation, and hydrocarbon oxidation. Thermal, biogeochemical, and microbiological characteristics of the sampling locations indicate that sediment thermal regime and seep-derived or hydrothermal energy sources structure the microbial communities at the sediment surface.
  • Dataset
    Summary geochemistry and radiotracer rates for 30 marine sediment cores covering eight sites and four geochemical regimes
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2021-02-24) Joye, Samantha B. ; Sibert, Ryan
    This dataset contains porewater geochemistry and rate data obtained from Gulf of Mexico sediments collected using both push core and multiple core technology. Sediment push cores were collected across multiple dives of HOV Alvin, during cruises AT18-02 (2010) and AT26-13 (2014) aboard the R/V Atlantis. Multiple cores were collected during cruises EN527, EN528, EN529, and EN586 aboard the R/V Endeavor. Procedures for sample processing were identical for both types of cores. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/830008
  • Dataset
    Porewater methane concentrations and d13C-CH4 values in Alvin pushcore samples from Guaymas Basin hydrothermal sediments collected on R/V Atlantis cruise AT37-06 in December 2016
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2021-03-12) Teske, Andreas ; Joye, Samantha B.
    Porewater methane concentrations and d13C-CH4 values in Alvin pushcore samples from Guaymas Basin hydrothermal sediments collected on R/V Atlantis cruise AT37-06 in December 2016. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/842974
  • Dataset
    Acetate and methanol turnover rates from sediment push cores collected during HOV Alvin dives during the R/V Atlantis cruise AT37-06 in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California in December 2016
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2020-12-09) Joye, Samantha B. ; Teske, Andreas P.
    Acetate and methanol turnover rates from sediment push cores obtained using the human-occupied deep-diving vehicle (HOV) Alvin dives 4867-4872 during the R/V Atlantis cruise AT37-06 in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (27 00.00 N, -111 20.00 W) in December 2016. These data were published in (Zhuang et al., 2018). For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/814406
  • Dataset
    Bottle data (including temperature, salinity, density, O2) from CTD rosettes from R/V Atlantis and R/V F.G. Walton Smith cruises AT18-02 and WS1010 in the Gulf of Mexico Macondo wellhead area in 2010 (DWH_Deep_Microbes project)
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2019-08-01) Joye, Samantha B.
    Bottle data (including temperature, salinity, density, O2) from CTD rosettes from R/V Atlantis and R/V F.G. Walton Smith cruises AT18-02 and WS1010 in the Gulf of Mexico Macondo wellhead area in 2010. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/3727
  • Dataset
    Sediment geochemistry summary from push cores collected during HOV Alvin dives during the R/V Atlantis cruise AT37-06 in the Guaymas Basin from December 2016
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2020-12-09) Joye, Samantha B. ; Teske, Andreas P.
    Sediment geochemistry summary from push cores collected during HOV Alvin dives during the R/V Atlantis cruise AT37-06 in the Guaymas Basin from December 2016. Part of this dataset was published in Zhuang et al., 2018. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/819127
  • Dataset
    Sediment geochemistry from push cores collected during HOV Alvin dives during the R/V Atlantis cruise AT37-06 in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California in December 2016
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2020-12-09) Joye, Samantha B. ; Teske, Andreas P.
    Sediment geochemistry from push cores obtained using the human-occupied deep-diving vehicle (HOV) Alvin dives 4867-4872 during the R/V Atlantis cruise AT37-06 in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (27 00.00 N, -111 20.00 W) in December 2016. These data were published in (Zhuang et al., 2018). For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/814391
  • Dataset
    Sediment geochemistry from push cores collected during HOV Alvin dives during the R/V Atlantis cruise AT42-05 in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (27 00.00 N, -111 20.00 W) in November 2018
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2021-01-25) Joye, Samantha B. ; Teske, Andreas P. ; Peterson, Richard N.
    Sediment geochemistry from push cores obtained using the human-occupied deep-diving vehicle (HOV) Alvin dives 4991-5000 during the R/V Atlantis cruise AT42-05 in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (27 00.00 N, -111 20.00 W) in November 2018. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/817797
  • Dataset
    Geochemical measurements of porewater from sediment push core samples in the Gulf of California during R/V Falkor cruise FK190211 in 2019
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2023-02-07) Joye, Samantha B.
    Geochemical measurements of porewater from sediment push core samples in the Gulf of California during R/V Falkor cruise FK190211 in 2019 For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/821665
  • Preprint
    Chemical dispersants can suppress the activity of natural oil-degrading microorganisms
    ( 2015-09) Kleindienst, Sara ; Seidel, Michael ; Ziervogel, Kai ; Grim, Sharon L. ; Loftis, Kathy ; Harrison, Sarah ; Malkin, Sairah Y. ; Perkins, Matthew J. ; Field, Jennifer ; Sogin, Mitchell L. ; Dittmar, Thorsten ; Passow, Uta ; Medeiros, Patricia M. ; Joye, Samantha B.
    During the Deepwater Horizon oil well blowout in the Gulf of Mexico, the application of 7 million liters of chemical dispersants aimed to stimulate microbial crude oil degradation by increasing the bioavailability of oil compounds. However, the effects of dispersants on oil biodegradation rates are debated. In laboratory experiments, we simulated environmental conditions comparable in the hydrocarbon-rich, 1100m deep, plume that formed during the Deepwater Horizon discharge. The presence of dispersant significantly altered the microbial community composition through selection for potential dispersant-degrading Colwellia, which also bloomed in situ in Gulf deep-waters during the discharge. In contrast, oil addition lacking dispersant stimulated growth of natural hydrocarbon-degrading Marinobacter. Dispersants did not enhance heterotrophic microbial activity or hydrocarbon oxidation rates. Extrapolating this comprehensive data set to real world scenarios questions whether dispersants stimulate microbial oil degradation in deep ocean waters and instead highlights that dispersants can exert a negative effect on microbial hydrocarbon degradation rates.
  • Article
    Transport, fate and impacts of the deep plume of petroleum hydrocarbons formed during the Macondo blowout
    (Frontiers Media, 2020-09-11) Bracco, Annalisa ; Paris, Claire B. ; Esbaugh, Andrew J. ; Frasier, Kaitlin ; Joye, Samantha B. ; Liu, Guangpeng ; Polzin, Kurt L. ; Vaz, Ana Carolina
    The 2010 Macondo oil well blowout consisted in a localized, intense infusion of petroleum hydrocarbons to the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico. A substantial amount of these hydrocarbons did not reach the ocean surface but remained confined at depth within subsurface plumes, the largest and deepest of which was found at ∼ 1000–1200 m of depth, along the continental slope (the deep plume). This review outlines the challenges the science community overcame since 2010, the discoveries and the remaining open questions in interpreting and predicting the distribution, fate and impact of the Macondo oil entrained in the deep plume. In the past 10 years, the scientific community supported by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) and others, has achieved key milestones in observing, conceptualizing and understanding the physical oceanography of the Gulf of Mexico along its northern continental shelf and slope. Major progress has been made in modeling the transport, evolution and degradation of hydrocarbons. Here we review this new knowledge and modeling tools, how our understanding of the deep plume formation and evolution has evolved, and how research in the past decade may help preparing the scientific community in the event of a future spill in the Gulf or elsewhere. We also summarize briefly current knowledge of the plume fate – in terms of microbial degradation and geochemistry – and impacts on fish, deep corals and mammals. Finally, we discuss observational, theoretical, and modeling limitations that constrain our ability to predict the three-dimensional movement of waters in this basin and the fate and impacts of the hydrocarbons they may carry, and we discuss research priorities to overcome them.
  • Article
    Characteristics and evolution of sill-driven off-axis hydrothermalism in Guaymas Basin - the Ringvent site
    (Nature Research, 2019-09-25) Teske, Andreas ; McKay, Luke J. ; Ravelo, Ana Christina ; Aiello, Ivano ; Mortera, Carlos ; Núñez-Useche, Fernando ; Canet, Carles ; Chanton, Jeffrey P. ; Brunner, Benjamin ; Hensen, Christian ; Ramírez, Gustavo A. ; Sibert, Ryan J. ; Turner, Tiffany ; Chambers, Christopher R. ; Buckley, Andrew ; Joye, Samantha B. ; Soule, S. Adam ; Lizarralde, Daniel
    The Guaymas Basin spreading center, at 2000 m depth in the Gulf of California, is overlain by a thick sedimentary cover. Across the basin, localized temperature anomalies, with active methane venting and seep fauna exist in response to magma emplacement into sediments. These sites evolve over thousands of years as magma freezes into doleritic sills and the system cools. Although several cool sites resembling cold seeps have been characterized, the hydrothermally active stage of an off-axis site was lacking good examples. Here, we present a multidisciplinary characterization of Ringvent, an ~1 km wide circular mound where hydrothermal activity persists ~28 km northwest of the spreading center. Ringvent provides a new type of intermediate-stage hydrothermal system where off-axis hydrothermal activity has attenuated since its formation, but remains evident in thermal anomalies, hydrothermal biota coexisting with seep fauna, and porewater biogeochemical signatures indicative of hydrothermal circulation. Due to their broad potential distribution, small size and limited life span, such sites are hard to find and characterize, but they provide critical missing links to understand the complex evolution of hydrothermal systems.
  • Dataset
    Porewater sulfate, sulfide, ammonia, phosphate, and silicate concentrations in Alvin pushcore samples from Guaymas Basin hydrothermal sediments collected on R/V Atlantis cruise AT37-06 in December 2016
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2021-03-12) Teske, Andreas ; Joye, Samantha B.
    Porewater sulfate, sulfide, ammonia, phosphate, and silicate concentrations in Alvin pushcore samples from Guaymas Basin hydrothermal sediments collected on R/V Atlantis cruise AT37-06 in December 2016. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/843000
  • Dataset
    Water column data from CTD casts along the East Siberian Arctic Shelf on R/V Oden during 2011 (ESAS Water Column Methane project)
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2019-04-22) Joye, Samantha B. ; Samarkin, Vladimir
    Water column data from CTD casts along the East Siberian Arctic Shelf on R/V Oden during 2011 (ESAS Water Column Methane project) For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/660543
  • Dataset
    Sediment geochemical and microbial activity data collected on R/V Oden along the East Siberian Arctic Shelf from 2014 (ESAS Water Column Methane project)
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2019-04-23) Joye, Samantha B. ; Samarkin, Vladimir
    Sediment geochemical and microbial activity data collected on R/V Oden along the East Siberian Arctic Shelf from 2014 (ESAS Water Column Methane project) For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/660527
  • Dataset
    Results from inhibition experiments conducted using sediment samples from push cores obtained using HOV Alvin dive 4869 during the R/V Atlantis cruise AT37-06 in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California in December 2016
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2020-12-09) Joye, Samantha B. ; Teske, Andreas P.
    Results from inhibition experiments conducted using sediment samples from push cores obtained using the human-occupied deep-diving vehicle (HOV) Alvin dive 4869 during the R/V Atlantis cruise AT37-06 in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (27 00.00 N, -111 20.00 W) in December 2016. These data were published in (Zhuang et al., 2018). For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/814415
  • Dataset
    Geochemical measurements of CTD and Alvin Niskin samples collected in the Gulf of California during R/V Falkor cruise FK190211 in 2019
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2023-02-07) Joye, Samantha B. ; Teske, Andreas
    For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/821645
  • Dataset
    Scientific sampling event logs from R/V Atlantis and R/V F.G. Walton Smith cruises AT18-02 and WS1010 in the Gulf of Mexico Macondo wellhead area in 2010 (DWH_Deep_Microbes project)
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2019-08-01) Joye, Samantha B.
    Scientific sampling event logs from R/V Atlantis and R/V F.G. Walton Smith cruises AT18-02 and WS1010 in the Gulf of Mexico Macondo wellhead area in 2010. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/3726