Pezoa Sergio

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Pezoa
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  • Article
    Measurements from the RV Ronald H. Brown and related platforms as part of the Atlantic Tradewind Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Interaction Campaign (ATOMIC)
    (Copernicus Publications, 2021-04-29) Quinn, Patricia K. ; Thompson, Elizabeth ; Coffman, Derek J. ; Baidar, Sunil ; Bariteau, Ludovic ; Bates, Timothy S. ; Bigorre, Sebastien P. ; Brewer, Alan ; de Boer, Gijs ; de Szoeke, Simon P. ; Drushka, Kyla ; Foltz, Gregory R. ; Intrieri, Janet ; Iyer, Suneil ; Fairall, Christopher W. ; Gaston, Cassandra J. ; Jansen, Friedhelm ; Johnson, James E. ; Krüger, Ovid O. ; Marchbanks, Richard D. ; Moran, Kenneth P. ; Noone, David ; Pezoa, Sergio ; Pincus, Robert ; Plueddemann, Albert J. ; Pöhlker, Mira L. ; Pöschl, Ulrich ; Quinones Melendez, Estefania ; Royer, Haley M. ; Szczodrak, Malgorzata ; Thomson, Jim ; Upchurch, Lucia M. ; Zhang, Chidong ; Zhang, Dongxiao ; Zuidema, Paquita
    The Atlantic Tradewind Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Interaction Campaign (ATOMIC) took place from 7 January to 11 July 2020 in the tropical North Atlantic between the eastern edge of Barbados and 51∘ W, the longitude of the Northwest Tropical Atlantic Station (NTAS) mooring. Measurements were made to gather information on shallow atmospheric convection, the effects of aerosols and clouds on the ocean surface energy budget, and mesoscale oceanic processes. Multiple platforms were deployed during ATOMIC including the NOAA RV Ronald H. Brown (RHB) (7 January to 13 February) and WP-3D Orion (P-3) aircraft (17 January to 10 February), the University of Colorado's Robust Autonomous Aerial Vehicle-Endurant Nimble (RAAVEN) uncrewed aerial system (UAS) (24 January to 15 February), NOAA- and NASA-sponsored Saildrones (12 January to 11 July), and Surface Velocity Program Salinity (SVPS) surface ocean drifters (23 January to 29 April). The RV Ronald H. Brown conducted in situ and remote sensing measurements of oceanic and atmospheric properties with an emphasis on mesoscale oceanic–atmospheric coupling and aerosol–cloud interactions. In addition, the ship served as a launching pad for Wave Gliders, Surface Wave Instrument Floats with Tracking (SWIFTs), and radiosondes. Details of measurements made from the RV Ronald H. Brown, ship-deployed assets, and other platforms closely coordinated with the ship during ATOMIC are provided here. These platforms include Saildrone 1064 and the RAAVEN UAS as well as the Barbados Cloud Observatory (BCO) and Barbados Atmospheric Chemistry Observatory (BACO). Inter-platform comparisons are presented to assess consistency in the data sets. Data sets from the RV Ronald H. Brown and deployed assets have been quality controlled and are publicly available at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) data archive (https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/archive/accession/ATOMIC-2020, last access: 2 April 2021). Point-of-contact information and links to individual data sets with digital object identifiers (DOIs) are provided herein.
  • Technical Report
    WHOI Hawaii Ocean Timeseries Station (WHOTS) : WHOTS-6 2009 mooring turnaround cruise report
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2010-02) Whelan, Sean P. ; Santiago-Mandujano, Fernando ; Bradley, Frank ; Plueddemann, Albert J. ; Barista, Ludovic ; Ryder, James R. ; Lukas, Roger ; Lethaby, Paul ; Snyder, Jefrey ; Sabine, Christopher L. ; Stanitski, Diane ; Rapp, Anita D. ; Fairall, Christopher W. ; Pezoa, Sergio ; Galbraith, Nancy R. ; Lord, Jeffrey ; Bahr, Frank B.
    The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) Hawaii Ocean Timeseries Site (WHOTS), 100 km north of Oahu, Hawaii, is intended to provide long-term, high-quality air-sea fluxes as a part of the NOAA Climate Observation Program. The WHOTS mooring also serves as a coordinated part of the Hawaiian Ocean Timeseries (HOT) program, contributing to the goals of observing heat, fresh water and chemical fluxes at a site representative of the oligotrophic North Pacific Ocean. The approach is to maintain a surface mooring outfitted for meteorological and oceanographic measurements at a site near 22.75°N, 158°W by successive mooring turnarounds. These observations will be used to investigate air–sea interaction processes related to climate variability. The first WHOTS mooring (WHOTS-1) was deployed in August 2004. Turnaround cruises for successive moorings (WHOTS-2 through WHOTS-5) have typically been in either June or July. This report documents recovery of the WHOTS-5 mooring and deployment of the sixth mooring (WHOTS-6). The moorings utilize Surlyn foam buoys as the surface element and are outfitted with two Air–Sea Interaction Meteorology (ASIMET) systems. Each ASIMET system measures, records, and transmits via Argos satellite the surface meteorological variables necessary to compute air–sea fluxes of heat, moisture and momentum. The upper 155 m of the mooring is outfitted with oceanographic sensors for the measurement of temperature, conductivity and velocity in a cooperative effort with R. Lukas of the University of Hawaii (UH). A pCO2 system is installed on the buoy in a cooperative effort with Chris Sabine at the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory. Dr. Frank Bradley, CSIRO, Australia, assisted with meteorological sensor comparisons. A NOAA “Teacher at Sea” and a NOAA “Teacher in the Lab” participated in the cruise. The WHOTS mooring turnaround was done on the University of Hawaii research vessel Kilo Moana, Cruise KM-09-16, by the Upper Ocean Processes Group of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in cooperation with UH and NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory, Physical Sciences Division (ESRL/PSD). The cruise took place between 9 and 17 July 2009. Operations began with deployment of the WHOTS-6 mooring on 10 July at approximately 22°40.0'N, 157°57.0'W in 4758 m of water. This was followed by meteorological intercomparisons and CTDs at the WHOTS-6 and WHOTS-5 sites. The WHOTS-5 mooring was recovered on 15 July 2009. The Kilo Moana then moved to the HOT central site (22°45.0'N, 158°00.0'W) for CTD casts. This report describes the cruise operations in more detail, as well as some of the in-port operations and pre-cruise buoy preparations.
  • Article
    Air-Sea trace gas fluxes: direct and indirect measurements
    (Frontiers Media, 2022-07-29) Fairall, Christopher W. ; Yang, Mingxi ; Brumer, Sophia E. ; Blomquist, Byron ; Edson, James B. ; Zappa, Christopher J. ; Bariteau, Ludovic ; Pezoa, Sergio ; Bell, Tom G. ; Saltzman, Eric
    The past decade has seen significant technological advance in the observation of trace gas fluxes over the open ocean, most notably CO2, but also an impressive list of other gases. Here we will emphasize flux observations from the air-side of the interface including both turbulent covariance (direct) and surface-layer similarity-based (indirect) bulk transfer velocity methods. Most applications of direct covariance observations have been from ships but recently work has intensified on buoy-based implementation. The principal use of direct methods is to quantify empirical coefficients in bulk estimates of the gas transfer velocity. Advances in direct measurements and some recent field programs that capture a considerable range of conditions with wind speeds exceeding 20 ms-1 are discussed. We use coincident direct flux measurements of CO2 and dimethylsulfide (DMS) to infer the scaling of interfacial viscous and bubble-mediated (whitecap driven) gas transfer mechanisms. This analysis suggests modest chemical enhancement of CO2 flux at low wind speed. We include some updates to the theoretical structure of bulk parameterizations (including chemical enhancement) as framed in the COAREG gas transfer algorithm.
  • Technical Report
    Stratus 14 : fourteenth setting of the Stratus Ocean Reference Station cruise on board RV Cabo de Hornos April 14 - 30, 2015 Valparaiso, Chile
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2015-04) Bigorre, Sebastien P. ; Weller, Robert A. ; Lord, Jeffrey ; Galbraith, Nancy R. ; Hasbrouck, Emerson ; Pezoa, Sergio ; Blomquist, Byron
    The Ocean Reference Station at 20°S, 85°W under the stratus clouds west of northern Chile is being maintained to provide ongoing climate-quality records of surface meteorology, air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater, and momentum, and of upper ocean temperature, salinity, and velocity variability. The Stratus Ocean Reference Station (ORS Stratus) is supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Climate Observation Program. It is recovered and redeployed annually, with past cruises that have come between October and January. This cruise was conducted on the Chilean research vessel Cabo de Hornos. During the 2015 cruise on the Cabo de Hornos to the ORS Stratus site, the primary activities were the recovery of the previous (Stratus 13) WHOI surface mooring, deployment of the new Stratus 14 WHOI surface mooring, in-situ calibration of the buoy meteorological sensors by comparison with instrumentation installed on the ship and CTD casts near the moorings. Surface drifters were also launched along the track.
  • Technical Report
    WHOI Hawaii Ocean Timeseries Station (WHOTS) : WHOTS-8 2011 mooring turnaround cruise report
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2012-04) Whelan, Sean P. ; Lord, Jeffrey ; Duncombe Rae, Chris M. ; Plueddemann, Albert J. ; Snyder, Jefrey ; Nosse, Craig ; Lukas, Roger ; Boylan, Patrick ; Pietro, Benjamin ; Bariteau, Ludovic ; Sabine, Christopher L. ; Pezoa, Sergio
    The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) Hawaii Ocean Timeseries (HOT) Site (WHOTS), 100 km north of Oahu, Hawaii, is intended to provide long-term, high-quality air-sea fluxes as a part of the NOAA Climate Observation Program. The WHOTS mooring also serves as a coordinated part of the HOT program, contributing to the goals of observing heat, fresh water and chemical fluxes at a site representative of the oligotrophic North Pacific Ocean. The approach is to maintain a surface mooring outfitted for meteorological and oceanographic measurements at a site near 22.75°N, 158°W by successive mooring turnarounds. These observations will be used to investigate air–sea interaction processes related to climate variability. This report documents recovery of the seventh WHOTS mooring (WHOTS-7) and deployment of the eighth mooring (WHOTS-8). Both moorings used Surlyn foam buoys as the surface element and were outfitted with two Air–Sea Interaction Meteorology (ASIMET) systems. Each ASIMET system measures, records, and transmits via Argos satellite the surface meteorological variables necessary to compute air–sea fluxes of heat, moisture and momentum. The upper 155 m of the moorings were outfitted with oceanographic sensors for the measurement of temperature, conductivity and velocity in a cooperative effort with R. Lukas of the University of Hawaii. A pCO2 system was installed on the WHOTS-8 buoy in a cooperative effort with Chris Sabine at the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory. A set of radiometers were installed in cooperation with Sam Laney at WHOI. The WHOTS mooring turnaround was done on the NOAA ship Hi’ialakai by the Upper Ocean Processes Group of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The cruise took place between 5 July and 13 July 2011. Operations began with deployment of the WHOTS-8 mooring on 6 July. This was followed by meteorological intercomparisons and CTDs. Recovery of WHOTS-7 took place on 11 July 2011. This report describes these cruise operations, as well as some of the in-port operations and pre-cruise buoy preparations.
  • Technical Report
    Stratus Ocean Reference Station (20˚S, 85˚W), mooring recovery and deployment cruise R/V Ronald H. Brown cruise 05-05, September 26, 2005–October 21, 2005
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2006-02) Hutto, Lara ; Weller, Robert A. ; Lord, Jeffrey ; Smith, Jason C. ; Bouchard, Paul R. ; Fairall, Christopher W. ; Pezoa, Sergio ; Bariteau, Ludovic ; Lundquist, Jessica ; Ghate, Virendra P. ; Castro, Rodrigo ; Cisternas, Carolina
    The Ocean Reference Station at 20°S, 85°W under the stratus clouds west of northern Chile is being maintained to provide ongoing, climate-quality records of surface meteorology, of air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater, and momentum, and of upper ocean temperature, salinity, and velocity variability. The Stratus Ocean Reference Station (ORS Stratus) is supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Climate Observation Program. It is recovered and redeployed annually, with cruises that have come between October and December. During the October 2005 cruise of NOAA’s R/V Ronald H. Brown to the ORS Stratus site, the primary activities were recovery of the WHOI surface mooring that had been deployed in December 2004, deployment of a new WHOI surface mooring at that site, in-situ calibration of the buoy meteorological sensors by comparison with instrumentation put on board by staff of the NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL), and observations of the stratus clouds and lower atmosphere by NOAA ETL. The ORS Stratus buoys are equipped with two Improved Meteorological (IMET) systems, which provide surface wind speed and direction, air temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, incoming shortwave radiation, incoming longwave radiation, precipitation rate, and sea surface temperature. The IMET data are made available in near real time using satellite telemetry. The mooring line carries instruments to measure ocean salinity, temperature, and currents. The ETL instrumentation used during the 2005 cruise included cloud radar, radiosonde ballons, and sensors for mean and turbulent surface meteorology. In addition, two technicians from the University of Concepcion collected water samples for chemical analysis. Finally, the cruise hosted a teacher participating in NOAA’s Teacher at Sea Program.
  • Technical Report
    Eighteenth Setting of the Stratus Ocean Reference Station Cruise On Board RV Cabo de Hornos April 8 - 27, 2019 Valparaiso, Chile - Valparaiso, Chile
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2019-10) Bigorre, Sebastien P. ; Hasbrouck, Emerson ; Pietro, Benjamin ; Search, Francesca ; Alquinta, Sasha ; Pezoa, Sergio ; Llanos, Nicolas
    The Ocean Reference Station at 20°S, 85°W under the stratus clouds west of northern Chile is being maintained to provide ongoing climate-quality records of surface meteorology, air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater, and momentum, and of upper ocean temperature, salinity, and velocity variability. The Stratus Ocean Reference Station (ORS Stratus) is supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Climate Observation Program. It is recovered and redeployed annually, with past cruises that have come between October and May. This cruise was conducted on the Chilean research vessel Cabo de Hornos. During the 2019 cruise on the Cabo de Hornos to the ORS Stratus site, the primary activities were the recovery of the previous (Stratus 17) WHOI surface mooring, deployment of the new Stratus 18 WHOI surface mooring, in-situ calibration of the buoy meteorological sensors by comparison with instrumentation installed on the ship, CTD casts near the moorings. Ancillary tasks performed were the deployments of surface drifters and ARGO floats along the track.
  • Technical Report
    Stratus 16 Sixteenth Setting of the Stratus Ocean Reference Station Cruise on Board RV Ronald H. Brown May 5 - 20, 2017 Rodman, Panama - Arica, Chile
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2021-01) Bigorre, Sebastien P. ; Weller, Robert A. ; Blomquist, Byron ; Pietro, Benjamin ; Hasbrouck, Emerson ; Pezoa, Sergio
    The Ocean Reference Station at 20°S, 85°W under the stratus clouds west of northern Chile is being maintained to provide ongoing climate-quality records of surface meteorology, air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater, and momentum, and of upper ocean temperature, salinity, and velocity variability. The Stratus Ocean Reference Station (ORS Stratus) is supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Climate Observation Program. It is recovered and redeployed annually, with past cruises that have come between October and May. This cruise was conducted on the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown. During the 2017 cruise on the Ronald H. Brown to the ORS Stratus site, the primary activities were the recovery of the previous (Stratus 15) WHOI surface mooring, deployment of the new Stratus 16 WHOI surface mooring, in-situ calibration of the buoy meteorological sensors by comparison with instrumentation installed on the ship, CTD casts near the moorings. Surface drifters and ARGO floats were also launched along the track.
  • Technical Report
    Stratus 17 seventeenth setting of the Stratus Ocean Reference Station cruise on board RV Cabo de Hornos April 3 - 16, 2018 Valparaiso - Valparaiso, Chile
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2021-03) Bigorre, Sebastien P. ; Pietro, Benjamin ; Gubler, Alejandra ; Search, Francesca ; Hasbrouck, Emerson ; Pezoa, Sergio ; Weller, Robert A.
    The Ocean Reference Station at 20°S, 85°W under the stratus clouds west of northern Chile is being maintained to provide ongoing climate-quality records of surface meteorology, air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater, and momentum, and of upper ocean temperature, salinity, and velocity variability. The Stratus Ocean Reference Station (ORS Stratus) is supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Climate Observation Program. It is recovered and redeployed annually, with past cruises that have come between October and May. This cruise was conducted on the Chilean research vessel Cabo de Hornos. During the 2018 cruise on the Cabo de Hornos to the ORS Stratus site, the primary activities were the recovery of the previous (Stratus 16) WHOI surface mooring, deployment of the new Stratus 17 WHOI surface mooring, in-situ calibration of the buoy meteorological sensors by comparison with instrumentation installed on the ship, CTD casts near the moorings. The Stratus 17 had parted from its anchor site on January 4 2018, so its recovery was done in two separate operations: first the drifting buoy with mooring line under it, then the bottom part still attached to the anchor. Surface drifters and ARGO floats were also launched along the track.