Church Thomas M.

No Thumbnail Available
Last Name
Church
First Name
Thomas M.
ORCID

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 11 of 11
  • Preprint
    Scavenging, cycling and removal fluxes of 210Po and 210Pb at the Bermuda time-series study site
    ( 2012-11-14) Hong, G. H. ; Baskaran, Mark ; Church, Thomas M. ; Conte, Maureen H.
    Quantifying relative affinities of Po and Pb in different populations of marine particulate matter is of great importance in utilizing 210Po as a tracer for carbon cycling. We collected and analyzed water samples for the concentrations of dissolved and total 210Po and 30 210Pb from the upper 600 m of the water column at Bermuda Time-series Study site (September 1999 to September 2000) to investigate their seasonality of concentrations and their activity ratio (210Po/210Pb activity ratio, AR). Sinking particles collected in sediment traps at depths of 500 m, 1500 m, and 3200 m from the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) time-series sediment traps were analyzed over a period of 12 months (May 1999 to May 2000). The objective was to compare the deficiencies of 210Po with respect to 210Pb in the water column to that measured in the sediment traps and to assess the relative affinities of Po and Pb with different particle pools. Inventories of 210Po in the upper 500 m water column varied by a factor of 2, indicating seasonal variations of particulate flux dominated the removal of 210Po. The 210Po/210Pb ARs in the dissolved phase were generally less than the secular equilibrium value (1.0) in the upper 600 m, while were generally greater than 1.0 in the particulate phase, indicating higher removal rates of 210Po relative to 210Pb by particulate matter. The measured fluxes of 210Po and 210Pb in the 500 m, 1500 m, and 3200 m traps increased with depth, while the 210Po/210Pb ARs decreased with depth except from May-August 1999. From the measured fluxes of 210Po and 210Pb at these three traps and the concentrations of 210Po and 210Pb in the water column, this region appears to be a sink for 210Pb which is likely brought-in by lateral advection.
  • Article
    On the fractional solubility of copper in marine aerosols : toxicity of aeolian copper revisited
    (American Geophysical Union, 2010-10-19) Sholkovitz, Edward R. ; Sedwick, Peter N. ; Church, Thomas M.
    Paytan et al. (2009) argue that the atmospheric deposition of aerosols lead to copper concentrations that are potentially toxic to marine phytoplankton in a large area of tropical and subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. A key assumption in their model is that all marine aerosols (mineral dust and anthropogenic particles) have a high (40%) fractional solubility of copper. Our data show that the fractional solubility of copper for Saharan dust over the Sargasso Sea and Bermuda is significantly lower (1–7%). In contrast, anthropogenic aerosols with non-Saharan sources have significantly higher values (10–100%). Hence, the potential Cu toxicity in the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic should be re-estimated, given the low fractional solubility of Cu in the Saharan dust that dominates aerosol deposition to this region.
  • Dataset
    Particulate 210Po and 210Pb from R/V Knorr KN199-04, KN204-01 in the Subtropical northern Atlantic Ocean from 2010-2011 (U.S. GEOTRACES NAT project)
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2020-03-30) Baskaran, Mark ; Church, Thomas M. ; Stewart, Gillian
    Particulate 210Po and 210Pb from R/V Knorr KN199-04, KN204-01 in the Subtropical northern Atlantic Ocean from 2010-2011. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/3917
  • Technical Report
    Coastal Ocean Processes : a science prospectus
    (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 1992-04) Brink, Kenneth H. ; Bane, John M. ; Church, Thomas M. ; Fairall, Christopher W. ; Geernaert, G. L. ; Hammond, D. E. ; Henrichs, S. M. ; Martens, C. S. ; Nittrouer, Charles A. ; Rogers, D. P. ; Roman, Michael R. ; Roughgarden, J. D. ; Smith, R. L. ; Wright, L. Donelson ; Yoder, James A.
    CoOP (Coastal Ocean Processes) is an organization meant to study major interdisciplinary scientific problems in the coastal ocean. Its goal is "to obtain a new level of quantitative understanding of the processes that dominate the transformations, transport and fates of biologically, chemically and geologically important matter on the continental margin". Central to obtaining this understanding will be advances in observing and modeling the cross-shelf component of transport. More specific objectives are to understand 1) cross-margin exchanges, 2) air sea exchanges, 3) benthic-pelagic exchanges, 4) terrestrial inputs and 5) biological and chemical transformations within the water column. CoOP research will be carried out primarly through a series of process-oriented field studies, each involving about two years of measurements. Each of these field studies is to be initiated and defined through a community workshop. In addition to the process studies, CoOP will also involve modeling, long time series, exploratory studies, remote sensing, technological innovation, data archiving and communications. A CoOP pilot study has been approved for funding by the National Science Foundation, and funding will begin in 1992. The CoOP science effort is thus already underway.
  • Preprint
    Fractional solubility of aerosol iron : synthesis of a global-scale data set
    ( 2012-04-06) Sholkovitz, Edward R. ; Sedwick, Peter N. ; Church, Thomas M. ; Baker, Alexander R. ; Powell, Claire F.
    Aerosol deposition provides a major input of the essential micronutrient iron to the open ocean. A critical parameter with respect to biological availability is the proportion of aerosol iron that enters the oceanic dissolved iron pool – the so-called fractional solubility of aerosol iron (%FeS). Here we present a global-scale compilation of total aerosol iron loading (FeT) and estimated %FeS values for ~1100 samples collected over the open ocean, the coastal ocean, and some continental sites, including a new data set from the Atlantic Ocean. Despite the wide variety of methods that have been used to define 'soluble' aerosol iron, our global-scale compilation reveals a remarkably consistent trend in the fractional solubility of aerosol iron as a function of total aerosol iron loading, with the great bulk of the data defining an hyperbolic trend. The hyperbolic trends that we observe for both global- and regional-scale data are adequately described by a simple two-component mixing model, whereby the fractional solubility of iron in the bulk aerosol reflects the conservative mixing of 'lithogenic' mineral dust (high FeT and low %FeS) and non-lithogenic 'combustion' aerosols (low FeT and high %FeS). An increasing body of empirical and model-based evidence points to anthropogenic fuel combustion as the major source of these non-lithogenic 'combustion' aerosols, implying that human emissions are a major determinant of the fractional solubility of iron in marine aerosols. The robust global-scale relationship between %FeS and FeT provides a simple heuristic method for estimating aerosol iron solubility at the regional to global scale.
  • Article
    Iron in the Sargasso Sea (Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study region) during summer : eolian imprint, spatiotemporal variability, and ecological implications
    (American Geophysical Union, 2005-10-13) Sedwick, Peter N. ; Church, Thomas M. ; Bowie, Andrew R. ; Marsay, Christopher M. ; Ussher, Simon J. ; Achilles, K. M. ; Lethaby, Paul ; Johnson, Rodney J. ; Sarin, M. M. ; McGillicuddy, Dennis J.
    We report iron measurements for water column and aerosol samples collected in the Sargasso Sea during July-August 2003 (summer 2003) and April-May 2004 (spring 2004). Our data reveal a large seasonal change in the dissolved iron (dFe) concentration of surface waters in the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study region, from ∼1–2 nM in summer 2003, when aerosol iron concentrations were high (mean 10 nmol m−3), to ∼0.1–0.2 nM in spring 2004, when aerosol iron concentrations were low (mean 0.64 nmol m−3). During summer 2003, we observed an increase of ∼0.6 nM in surface water dFe concentrations over 13 days, presumably due to eolian iron input; an estimate of total iron deposition over this same period suggests an effective solubility of 3–30% for aerosol iron. Our summer 2003 water column profiles show potentially growth-limiting dFe concentrations (0.02–0.19 nM) coinciding with a deep chlorophyll maximum at 100–150 m depth, where phytoplankton biomass is typically dominated by Prochlorococcus during late summer.
  • Article
    Controls on dissolved cobalt in surface waters of the Sargasso Sea : comparisons with iron and aluminum
    (American Geophysical Union, 2012-05-19) Shelley, Rachel U. ; Sedwick, Peter N. ; Bibby, Thomas S. ; Cabedo-Sanz, P. ; Church, Thomas M. ; Johnson, Rodney J. ; Macey, A. I. ; Marsay, Christopher M. ; Sholkovitz, Edward R. ; Ussher, Simon J. ; Worsfold, Paul J. ; Lohan, Maeve C.
    Dissolved cobalt (dCo), iron (dFe) and aluminum (dAl) were determined in water column samples along a meridional transect (~31°N to 24°N) south of Bermuda in June 2008. A general north-to-south increase in surface concentrations of dFe (0.3–1.6 nM) and dAl (14–42 nM) was observed, suggesting that aerosol deposition is a significant source of dFe and dAl, whereas no clear trend was observed for near-surface dCo concentrations. Shipboard aerosol samples indicate fractional solubility values of 8–100% for aerosol Co, which are significantly higher than corresponding estimates of the solubility of aerosol Fe (0.44–45%). Hydrographic observations and analysis of time series rain samples from Bermuda indicate that wet deposition accounts for most (>80%) of the total aeolian flux of Co, and hence a significant proportion of the atmospheric input of dCo to our study region. Our aerosol data imply that the atmospheric input of dCo to the Sargasso Sea is modest, although this flux may be more significant in late summer. The water column dCo profiles reveal a vertical distribution that predominantly reflects ‘nutrient-type’ behavior, versus scavenged-type behavior for dAl, and a hybrid of nutrient- and scavenged-type behavior for dFe. Mesoscale eddies also appear to impact on the vertical distribution of dCo. The effects of biological removal of dCo from the upper water column were apparent as pronounced sub-surface minima (21 ± 4 pM dCo), coincident with maxima in Prochlorococcus abundance. These observations imply that Prochlorococcus plays a major role in removing dCo from the euphotic zone, and that the availability of dCo may regulate Prochlorococcus growth in the Sargasso Sea.
  • Article
    The GEOTRACES Intermediate Data Product 2014
    (Elsevier, 2015-04-16) Mawji, Edward ; Schlitzer, Reiner ; Dodas, Elena Masferrer ; Abadie, Cyril ; Abouchami, Wafa ; Anderson, Robert F. ; Baars, Oliver ; Bakker, Karel ; Baskaran, Mark ; Bates, Nicholas R. ; Bluhm, Katrin ; Bowie, Andrew R. ; Bown, Johann ; Boye, Marie ; Marie, Edward A. ; Branellec, Pierre ; Bruland, Kenneth W. ; Brzezinski, Mark A. ; Bucciarelli, Eva ; Buesseler, Ken O. ; Butler, Edward ; Cai, Pinghe ; Cardinal, Damien ; Casciotti, Karen L. ; Chaves, Joaquin E. ; Cheng, Hai ; Chever, Fanny ; Church, Thomas M. ; Colman, Albert S. ; Conway, Tim M. ; Croot, Peter L. ; Cutter, Gregory A. ; Baar, Hein J. W. de ; de Souza, Gregory F. ; Dehairs, Frank ; Deng, Feifei ; Dieu, Huong Thi ; Dulaquais, Gabriel ; Echegoyen-Sanz, Yolanda ; Edwards, R. Lawrence ; Fahrbach, Eberhard ; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N. ; Fleisher, Martin Q. ; Frank, Martin ; Friedrich, Jana ; Fripiat, Francois ; Galer, Stephen J. G. ; Gamo, Toshitaka ; Garcia Solsona, Ester ; Gerringa, Loes J. A. ; Godoy, Jose Marcus ; Gonzalez, Santiago ; Grossteffan, Emilie ; Hatta, Mariko ; Hayes, Christopher T. ; Heller, Maija Iris ; Henderson, Gideon M. ; Huang, Kuo-Fang ; Jeandel, Catherine ; Jenkins, William J. ; John, Seth G. ; Kenna, Timothy C. ; Klunder, Maarten ; Kretschmer, Sven ; Kumamoto, Yuichiro ; Laan, Patrick ; Labatut, Marie ; Lacan, Francois ; Lam, Phoebe J. ; Lannuzel, Delphine ; le Moigne, Frederique ; Lechtenfeld, Oliver J. ; Lohan, Maeve C. ; Lu, Yanbin ; Masqué, Pere ; McClain, Charles R. ; Measures, Christopher I. ; Middag, Rob ; Moffett, James W. ; Navidad, Alicia ; Nishioka, Jun ; Noble, Abigail E. ; Obata, Hajime ; Ohnemus, Daniel C. ; Owens, Stephanie A. ; Planchon, Frederic ; Pradoux, Catherine ; Puigcorbe, Viena ; Quay, Paul D. ; Radic, Amandine ; Rehkamper, Mark ; Remenyi, Tomas A. ; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A. ; Rintoul, Stephen R. ; Robinson, Laura F. ; Roeske, Tobias ; Rosenberg, Mark ; Rutgers van der Loeff, Michiel M. ; Ryabenko, Evgenia ; Saito, Mak A. ; Roshan, Saeed ; Salt, Lesley ; Sarthou, Geraldine ; Schauer, Ursula ; Scott, Peter M. ; Sedwick, Peter N. ; Sha, Lijuan ; Shiller, Alan M. ; Sigman, Daniel M. ; Smethie, William M. ; Smith, Geoffrey J. ; Sohrin, Yoshiki ; Speich, Sabrina ; Stichel, Torben ; Stutsman, Johnny ; Swift, James H. ; Tagliabue, Alessandro ; Thomas, Alexander L. ; Tsunogai, Urumu ; Twining, Benjamin S. ; van Aken, Hendrik M. ; van Heuven, Steven ; van Ooijen, Jan ; van Weerlee, Evaline ; Venchiarutti, Celia ; Voelker, Antje H. L. ; Wake, Bronwyn ; Warner, Mark J. ; Woodward, E. Malcolm S. ; Wu, Jingfeng ; Wyatt, Neil ; Yoshikawa, Hisayuki ; Zheng, Xin-Yuan ; Xue, Zichen ; Zieringer, Moritz ; Zimmer, Louise A.
    The GEOTRACES Intermediate Data Product 2014 (IDP2014) is the first publicly available data product of the international GEOTRACES programme, and contains data measured and quality controlled before the end of 2013. It consists of two parts: (1) a compilation of digital data for more than 200 trace elements and isotopes (TEIs) as well as classical hydrographic parameters, and (2) the eGEOTRACES Electronic Atlas providing a strongly inter-linked on-line atlas including more than 300 section plots and 90 animated 3D scenes. The IDP2014 covers the Atlantic, Arctic, and Indian oceans, exhibiting highest data density in the Atlantic. The TEI data in the IDP2014 are quality controlled by careful assessment of intercalibration results and multi-laboratory data comparisons at cross-over stations. The digital data are provided in several formats, including ASCII spreadsheet, Excel spreadsheet, netCDF, and Ocean Data View collection. In addition to the actual data values the IDP2014 also contains data quality flags and 1-σ data error values where available. Quality flags and error values are useful for data filtering. Metadata about data originators, analytical methods and original publications related to the data are linked to the data in an easily accessible way. The eGEOTRACES Electronic Atlas is the visual representation of the IDP2014 data providing section plots and a new kind of animated 3D scenes. The basin-wide 3D scenes allow for viewing of data from many cruises at the same time, thereby providing quick overviews of large-scale tracer distributions. In addition, the 3D scenes provide geographical and bathymetric context that is crucial for the interpretation and assessment of observed tracer plumes, as well as for making inferences about controlling processes.
  • Dataset
    Fractional solubility of aerosol iron : synthesis of a global-scale data set
    ( 2011-10-05) Sholkovitz, Edward R. ; Sedwick, Peter N. ; Church, Thomas M. ; Baker, Alexander R. ; Powell, Claire F.
    Aerosol deposition provides a major input of the essential micronutrient iron to the open ocean. A critical parameter with respect to bioavailability is the proportion of aerosol iron that enters the oceanic dissolved iron pool – the so-called fractional solubility of aerosol iron (%FeS). Here we present a global-scale compilation of total aerosol iron loading (FeT) and %FeS values for ~1100 samples collected over the open ocean, the coastal ocean, and some continental sites, including new data from the Atlantic Ocean. The global-scale compilation reveals a remarkably consistent trend in the fractional solubility of aerosol iron as a function of total aerosol iron loading, with the great bulk of the data falling along an inverse hyperbolic trend. The large dynamic range in %FeS (0-95%) varies with FeT in a manner similar to that identified for aerosols collected in the Sargasso Sea by Sedwick et al. (2007), who posit that the trend reflects near-conservative mixing between air masses that carry lithogenic mineral dust (with high FeT and low %FeS) and non-soil-dust aerosols such as anthropogenic combustion emissions (with low FeT and high %FeS), respectively. An increasing body of empirical evidence points to the importance of aerosol source and composition in determining the fractional solubility of aerosol iron, such that anthropogenic combustion emissions appear to play a critical role in determining this parameter in the bulk marine aerosol. The robust global-scale relationship between %FeS and FeT may provide a simple heuristic method for estimating aerosol iron solubility at the regional to global scale.
  • Dataset
    Fractional solubility of aerosol iron : synthesis of a global-scale data set [revised]
    ( 2012-03-26) Sholkovitz, Edward R. ; Sedwick, Peter N. ; Church, Thomas M. ; Baker, Alexander R. ; Powell, Claire F.
    Aerosol deposition provides a major input of the essential micronutrient iron to the open ocean. A critical parameter with respect to biological availability is the proportion of aerosol iron that enters the oceanic dissolved iron pool – the so-called fractional solubility of aerosol iron (%FeS). Here we present a global-scale compilation of total aerosol iron loading (FeT) and estimated %FeS values for ~1100 samples collected over the open ocean, the coastal ocean, and some continental sites, including a new data set from the Atlantic Ocean. Despite the wide variety of methods that have been used to define 'soluble' aerosol iron, our global-scale compilation reveals a remarkably consistent trend in the fractional solubility of aerosol iron as a function of total aerosol iron loading, with the great bulk of the data defining an hyperbolic trend. The hyperbolic trends that we observe for both global- and regional-scale data are adequately described by a simple two-component mixing model, whereby the fractional solubility of iron in the bulk aerosol reflects the conservative mixing of 'lithogenic' mineral dust (high FeT and low %FeS) and non-lithogenic 'combustion' aerosols (low FeT and high %FeS). An increasing body of empirical and model-based evidence points to anthropogenic fuel combustion as the major source of these non-lithogenic 'combustion' aerosols, implying that human emissions are a major determinant of the fractional solubility of iron in marine aerosols. The robust global-scale relationship between %FeS and FeT provides a simple heuristic method for estimating aerosol iron solubility at the regional to global scale.
  • Article
    The GEOTRACES Intermediate Data Product 2017
    (Elsevier, 2018-06-01) Schlitzer, Reiner ; Anderson, Robert F. ; Dodas, Elena Masferrer ; Lohan, Maeve C. ; Geibert, Walter ; Tagliabue, Alessandro ; Bowie, Andrew R. ; Jeandel, Catherine ; Maldonado, Maria T. ; Landing, William M. ; Cockwell, Donna ; Abadie, Cyril ; Abouchami, Wafa ; Achterberg, Eric P. ; Agather, Alison ; Aguliar-Islas, Ana ; van Aken, Hendrik M. ; Andersen, Morten ; Archer, Corey ; Auro, Maureen E. ; Baar, Hein J. W. de ; Baars, Oliver ; Baker, Alex R. ; Bakker, Karel ; Basak, Chandranath ; Baskaran, Mark ; Bates, Nicholas R. ; Bauch, Dorothea ; van Beek, Pieter ; Behrens, Melanie K. ; Black, Erin E. ; Bluhm, Katrin ; Bopp, Laurent ; Bouman, Heather ; Bowman, Katlin ; Bown, Johann ; Boyd, Philip ; Boye, Marie ; Boyle, Edward A. ; Branellec, Pierre ; Bridgestock, Luke ; Brissebrat, Guillaume ; Browning, Thomas ; Bruland, Kenneth W. ; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen ; Brzezinski, Mark A. ; Buck, Clifton S. ; Buck, Kristen N. ; Buesseler, Ken O. ; Bull, Abby ; Butler, Edward ; Cai, Pinghe ; Cámara Mor, Patricia ; Cardinal, Damien ; Carlson, Craig ; Carrasco, Gonzalo ; Casacuberta, Nuria ; Casciotti, Karen L. ; Castrillejo, Maxi ; Chamizo, Elena ; Chance, Rosie ; Charette, Matthew A. ; Chaves, Joaquin E. ; Cheng, Hai ; Chever, Fanny ; Christl, Marcus ; Church, Thomas M. ; Closset, Ivia ; Colman, Albert S. ; Conway, Tim M. ; Cossa, Daniel ; Croot, Peter L. ; Cullen, Jay T. ; Cutter, Gregory A. ; Daniels, Chris ; Dehairs, Frank ; Deng, Feifei ; Dieu, Huong Thi ; Duggan, Brian ; Dulaquais, Gabriel ; Dumousseaud, Cynthia ; Echegoyen-Sanz, Yolanda ; Edwards, R. Lawrence ; Ellwood, Michael J. ; Fahrbach, Eberhard ; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N. ; Flegal, A. Russell ; Fleisher, Martin Q. ; van de Flierdt, Tina ; Frank, Martin ; Friedrich, Jana ; Fripiat, Francois ; Fröllje, Henning ; Galer, Stephen J. G. ; Gamo, Toshitaka ; Ganeshram, Raja S. ; Garcia-Orellana, Jordi ; Garcia Solsona, Ester ; Gault-Ringold, Melanie ; George, Ejin ; Gerringa, Loes J. A. ; Gilbert, Melissa ; Godoy, Jose Marcus ; Goldstein, Steven L. ; Gonzalez, Santiago ; Grissom, Karen ; Hammerschmidt, Chad R. ; Hartman, Alison ; Hassler, Christel ; Hathorne, Ed C. ; Hatta, Mariko ; Hawco, Nicholas J. ; Hayes, Christopher T. ; Heimbürger, Lars-Eric ; Helgoe, Josh ; Heller, Maija Iris ; Henderson, Gideon M. ; Henderson, Paul B. ; van Heuven, Steven ; Ho, Peng ; Horner, Tristan J. ; Hsieh, Yu-Te ; Huang, Kuo-Fang ; Humphreys, Matthew P. ; Isshiki, Kenji ; Jacquot, Jeremy E. ; Janssen, David J. ; Jenkins, William J. ; John, Seth ; Jones, Elizabeth M. ; Jones, Janice L. ; Kadko, David ; Kayser, Rick ; Kenna, Timothy C. ; Khondoker, Roulin ; Kim, Taejin ; Kipp, Lauren ; Klar, Jessica K. ; Klunder, Maarten ; Kretschmer, Sven ; Kumamoto, Yuichiro ; Laan, Patrick ; Labatut, Marie ; Lacan, Francois ; Lam, Phoebe J. ; Lambelet, Myriam ; Lamborg, Carl H. ; le Moigne, Frederique ; Le Roy, Emilie ; Lechtenfeld, Oliver J. ; Lee, Jong-Mi ; Lherminier, Pascale ; Little, Susan ; López-Lora, Mercedes ; Lu, Yanbin ; Masque, Pere ; Mawji, Edward ; McClain, Charles R. ; Measures, Christopher I. ; Mehic, Sanjin ; Menzel Barraqueta, Jan-Lukas ; Merwe, Pier van der ; Middag, Rob ; Mieruch, Sebastian ; Milne, Angela ; Minami, Tomoharu ; Moffett, James W. ; Moncoiffe, Gwenaelle ; Moore, Willard S. ; Morris, Paul J. ; Morton, Peter L. ; Nakaguchi, Yuzuru ; Nakayama, Noriko ; Niedermiller, John ; Nishioka, Jun ; Nishiuchi, Akira ; Noble, Abigail E. ; Obata, Hajime ; Ober, Sven ; Ohnemus, Daniel C. ; van Ooijen, Jan ; O'Sullivan, Jeanette ; Owens, Stephanie A. ; Pahnke, Katharina ; Paul, Maxence ; Pavia, Frank ; Pena, Leopoldo D. ; Peters, Brian ; Planchon, Frederic ; Planquette, Helene ; Pradoux, Catherine ; Puigcorbé, Viena ; Quay, Paul D. ; Queroue, Fabien ; Radic, Amandine ; Rauschenberg, Sara ; Rehkämper, Mark ; Rember, Robert ; Remenyi, Tomas A. ; Resing, Joseph A. ; Rickli, Joerg ; Rigaud, Sylvain ; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A. ; Rintoul, Stephen R. ; Robinson, Laura F. ; Roca-Martí, Montserrat ; Rodellas, Valenti ; Roeske, Tobias ; Rolison, John M. ; Rosenberg, Mark ; Roshan, Saeed ; Rutgers van der Loeff, Michiel M. ; Ryabenko, Evgenia ; Saito, Mak A. ; Salt, Lesley ; Sanial, Virginie ; Sarthou, Geraldine ; Schallenberg, Christina ; Schauer, Ursula ; Scher, Howie ; Schlosser, Christian ; Schnetger, Bernhard ; Scott, Peter M. ; Sedwick, Peter N. ; Semiletov, Igor P. ; Shelley, Rachel U. ; Sherrell, Robert M. ; Shiller, Alan M. ; Sigman, Daniel M. ; Singh, Sunil Kumar ; Slagter, Hans ; Slater, Emma ; Smethie, William M. ; Snaith, Helen ; Sohrin, Yoshiki ; Sohst, Bettina M. ; Sonke, Jeroen E. ; Speich, Sabrina ; Steinfeldt, Reiner ; Stewart, Gillian ; Stichel, Torben ; Stirling, Claudine H. ; Stutsman, Johnny ; Swarr, Gretchen J. ; Swift, James H. ; Thomas, Alexander ; Thorne, Kay ; Till, Claire P. ; Till, Ralph ; Townsend, Ashley T. ; Townsend, Emily ; Tuerena, Robyn ; Twining, Benjamin S. ; Vance, Derek ; Velazquez, Sue ; Venchiarutti, Celia ; Villa-Alfageme, Maria ; Vivancos, Sebastian M. ; Voelker, Antje H. L. ; Wake, Bronwyn ; Warner, Mark J. ; Watson, Ros ; van Weerlee, Evaline ; Weigand, M. Alexandra ; Weinstein, Yishai ; Weiss, Dominik ; Wisotzki, Andreas ; Woodward, E. Malcolm S. ; Wu, Jingfeng ; Wu, Yingzhe ; Wuttig, Kathrin ; Wyatt, Neil ; Xiang, Yang ; Xie, Ruifang C. ; Xue, Zichen ; Yoshikawa, Hisayuki ; Zhang, Jing ; Zhang, Pu ; Zhao, Ye ; Zheng, Linjie ; Zheng, Xin-Yuan ; Zieringer, Moritz ; Zimmer, Louise A. ; Ziveri, Patrizia ; Zunino, Patricia ; Zurbrick, Cheryl
    The GEOTRACES Intermediate Data Product 2017 (IDP2017) is the second publicly available data product of the international GEOTRACES programme, and contains data measured and quality controlled before the end of 2016. The IDP2017 includes data from the Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic, Southern and Indian oceans, with about twice the data volume of the previous IDP2014. For the first time, the IDP2017 contains data for a large suite of biogeochemical parameters as well as aerosol and rain data characterising atmospheric trace element and isotope (TEI) sources. The TEI data in the IDP2017 are quality controlled by careful assessment of intercalibration results and multi-laboratory data comparisons at crossover stations. The IDP2017 consists of two parts: (1) a compilation of digital data for more than 450 TEIs as well as standard hydrographic parameters, and (2) the eGEOTRACES Electronic Atlas providing an on-line atlas that includes more than 590 section plots and 130 animated 3D scenes. The digital data are provided in several formats, including ASCII, Excel spreadsheet, netCDF, and Ocean Data View collection. Users can download the full data packages or make their own custom selections with a new on-line data extraction service. In addition to the actual data values, the IDP2017 also contains data quality flags and 1-σ data error values where available. Quality flags and error values are useful for data filtering and for statistical analysis. Metadata about data originators, analytical methods and original publications related to the data are linked in an easily accessible way. The eGEOTRACES Electronic Atlas is the visual representation of the IDP2017 as section plots and rotating 3D scenes. The basin-wide 3D scenes combine data from many cruises and provide quick overviews of large-scale tracer distributions. These 3D scenes provide geographical and bathymetric context that is crucial for the interpretation and assessment of tracer plumes near ocean margins or along ridges. The IDP2017 is the result of a truly international effort involving 326 researchers from 25 countries. This publication provides the critical reference for unpublished data, as well as for studies that make use of a large cross-section of data from the IDP2017. This article is part of a special issue entitled: Conway GEOTRACES - edited by Tim M. Conway, Tristan Horner, Yves Plancherel, and Aridane G. González.