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dc.contributor.authorLam, Ying-Wan  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Lawrence B.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZochowski, Michal R.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2005-12-30T20:02:45Z
dc.date.available2005-12-30T20:02:45Z
dc.date.issued2002-11-16
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/364
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2003. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Blackwell Publishing for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in European Journal of Neuroscience 17 (2003): 436-446, doi:10.1046/j.1460-9568.2003.02457.x.
dc.description.abstractThe odour-induced population response in the in vivo turtle (Terepene sp.) olfactory bulb consists of three oscillatory components (rostral, middle and caudal) that ride on top of a DC signal. In an initial step to determine the functional role of these four signals, we compared the signals elicited by different odorants. Most experiments compared isoamyl acetate and cineole, odorants which have very different maps of input to olfactory bulb glomeruli in the turtle and a different perceptual quality for humans. We found substantial differences in the response to the two odours in the rise-time of the DC signal and in the latency of the middle oscillation. The rate of rise for cineole was twice as fast as that for isoamyl acetate. Similarly, the latency for the middle oscillation was about twice as long for isoamyl acetate as it was for cineole. On the other hand, a number of characteristics of the signals were not substantially different for the two odorants. These included the latency of the rostral and caudal oscillation, the frequency and envelope of all three oscillations and their locations and spatial extents. A smaller number of experiments were carried out with hexanone and hexanal; the oscillations elicited by these odorants did not appear to be different from those elicited by isoamyl acetate and cineole. Qualitative differences between the oscillations in the turtle and those in two invertebrate phyla suggest that different odour processing strategies may be used.en
dc.description.sponsorshipSupported in part by NIH grant DC05259 and a Brown-Coxe fellowship from the Yale University School of Medicine.en
dc.format.extent376581 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1046/j.1460-9568.2003.02457.x
dc.subjectOptical recordingen
dc.subjectTerepene sp.en
dc.subjectVoltage-sensitive dyesen
dc.titleOdorant specificity of three oscillations and the DC signal in the turtle olfactory bulben
dc.typePreprinten


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