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dc.contributor.authorSaenz-Agudelo, Pablo  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorJones, Geoffrey P.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorThorrold, Simon R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPlanes, Serge  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-08T15:35:06Z
dc.date.available2009-05-08T15:35:06Z
dc.date.issued2008-11-21
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/2821
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Blackwell Publishing, 2009. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Blackwell Publishing for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Molecular Ecology 18 (2009): 1765-1776, doi:10.1111/j.1365-294X.2009.04109.x.en
dc.description.abstractThe application of spatially explicit models of population dynamics to fisheries management and the design marine reserves network systems has been limited due to a lack of empirical estimates of larval dispersal. Here we compared assignment tests and parentage analysis for examining larval retention and connectivity under two different gene flow scenarios using panda clownfish (Amphiprion polymnus) in Papua New Guinea. A metapopulation of panda clownfish in Bootless Bay with little or no genetic differentiation among 5 spatially discrete locations separated by 2-6km provided the high gene flow scenario. The low gene flow scenario compared the Bootless Bay metapopulation with a genetically distinct population (Fst = 0.1) located at Schumann Island, New Britain, 1,500km to the north-east. We used assignment tests and parentage analysis based on microsatellite DNA data to identify natal origins of 177 juveniles in Bootless Bay and 73 juveniles at Schumann Island. At low rates of gene flow, assignment tests correctly classified juveniles to their source population. On the other hand, parentage analysis led to an overestimate of self-recruitment within the two populations due to the significant deviation from panmixia when both populations were pooled. At high gene flow (within Bootless Bay), assignment tests underestimated self-recruitment and connectivity among subpopulations, and grossly overestimated self-recruitment within the overall metapopulation. However, the assignment tests did identify immigrants from distant (genetically distinct) populations. Parentage analysis clearly provided the most accurate estimates of connectivity in situations of high gene flow.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank ARC Centre of Excellence, the National Science Foundation (OCE 0424688), the Coral Reef Initiatives for the Pacific (CRISP), the TOTAL Foundation, Populations Fractionées et Insulaires (PPF EPHE) and GEF/World bank’s CRTR program (Connectivity working group) for financial support.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2009.04109.x
dc.subjectAssignment testsen
dc.subjectCoral-reef ecologyen
dc.subjectConnectivityen
dc.subjectLarval dispersalen
dc.subjectMarine protected areasen
dc.subjectMetapopulationen
dc.subjectMicrosatellitesen
dc.subjectParentage analysisen
dc.subjectSelf-recruitmenten
dc.titleEstimating connectivity in marine populations : an empirical evaluation of assignment tests and parentage analysis under different gene flow scenariosen
dc.typePreprinten


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