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dc.contributor.authorStanley, Rachel H. R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMcGillicuddy, Dennis J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSandwith, Zoe O.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPleskow, Haley M.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-16T16:38:51Z
dc.date.available2018-02-16T16:38:51Z
dc.date.issued2017-10
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/9588
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2017. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here under a nonexclusive, irrevocable, paid-up, worldwide license granted to WHOI. It is made available for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers 130 (2017): 1-11, doi:10.1016/j.dsr.2017.10.005.en_US
dc.description.abstractModeling studies have shown that mesoscale and submesoscale processes can stimulate phytoplankton productivity and export production. Here, we present observations from an undulating, towed Video Plankton Recorder (VPR-II) in the tropical Atlantic. The VPR-II collected profiles of oxygen, fluorescence, temperature and salinity in the upper 140 m of the water column at a spatial resolution of 1 m in the vertical and <2 km in the horizontal. The data reveal remarkable "hotspots", i.e. locations 5 to 10 km wide which have elevated fluorescence and decreased oxygen, both of which are likely the result of intense submesoscale upwelling. Based on estimates of source water, estimated from identical temperature and salinity surfaces, hotspots are more often areas of net respiration than areas of net production — although the inferred changes in oxygen are subject to uncertainty in the determination of the source of the upwelled waters since the true source water may not have been sampled. We discuss the spatial distribution of these hotspots and present a conceptual model outlining their possible generation and decline. Simultaneous measurements of O2/Ar in the mixed layer from a shipboard mass spectrometer provide estimates of rates of surface net community production. We find that the subsurface biological hotspots are often expressed as an increase in mixed layer rates of net community production. Overall, the large number of these hotspots support the growing evidence that submesoscale processes are important drivers in upper ocean biological production.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding for this work came from the National Science Foundation (R.H.R.S. and D.J.M) (OCE-0925284, OCE-1048897, and OCE- 1029676) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (D.J.M.) (NNX08AL71G and NNX13AE47G).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr.2017.10.005
dc.subjectNet Community Productionen_US
dc.subjectPhotosynthesisen_US
dc.subjectRespirationen_US
dc.subjectOxygenen_US
dc.subjectFluorescenceen_US
dc.subjectPatchinessen_US
dc.subjectHotspotsen_US
dc.subjectO2/Aren_US
dc.titleSubmesoscale hotspots of productivity and respiration : insights from high-resolution oxygen and fluorescence sectionsen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US


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