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dc.contributor.authorRamsey, Andree L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorStraneo, Fiamma  Concept link
dc.coverage.spatialHudson Bay
dc.coverage.spatialLabrador Sea
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-15T14:12:31Z
dc.date.available2018-02-15T14:12:31Z
dc.date.issued2018-01
dc.identifier.citationRamsey, A. L., & Straneo, F. (2018). Pathways for the export of Arctic change into the North Atlantic. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. https://doi.org/10.1575/1912/9575
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/9575
dc.description.abstractThe goal of the Pathways for the Export of Arctic Change into the North Atlantic project was to measure the exchange between the Hudson Bay System and the Labrador Sea, which occurs in the Hudson Strait. This exchange is of climactic relevance since a large amount of fresh water flows through the Hudson Strait into the Labrador Sea, where it can modulate the exchange of heat with the atmosphere. It is also of regional importance since the exchange influences the climate of Hudson Bay, which is home to a large indigenous population. The project consisted of deploying four subsurface moorings, over a one-year period, beginning August 2008 and ending September 2009. The moorings were positioned across the strait with Mooring A located on the south side and Moorings E, F, and G on the north side. The moorings were equipped with instruments to measure conductivity, temperature, pressure, ice draft and velocity.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe National Science Foundation Grant Number OCE-0751554 provided funding for the project.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWoods Hole Oceanographic Institutionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWHOI Technical Reportsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWHOI-2018-01en_US
dc.subjectFresh water
dc.titlePathways for the export of Arctic change into the North Atlanticen_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1575/1912/9575


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