Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFratantoni, David M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorO’Brien, Jeff  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorFlagg, Charles Noel  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRossby, H. Thomas  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-09T20:33:21Z
dc.date.available2018-06-28T08:29:36Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-28
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 34 (2017): 2673-2682en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/9552
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Meteorological Society, 2017. This article is posted here by permission of American Meteorological Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 34 (2017): 2673-2682, doi:10.1175/JTECH-D-17-0054.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractExpendable bathythermographs (XBT) to profile upper-ocean temperatures from vessels in motion have been in use for some 50 years now. Developed originally for navy use, they were soon adapted by oceanographers to map out upper-ocean thermal structure and its space–-time variability from both research vessels and merchant marine vessels in regular traffic. These activities continue today. This paper describes a new technology—the Autonomous Expendable Instrument System (AXIS)—that has been developed to provide the capability to deploy XBT probes on a predefined schedule, or adaptively in response to specific events without the presence of an observer on board. AXIS is a completely self-contained system that can hold up to 12 expendable probes [XBTs, XCTDs, expendable sound velocimeter (XSV)] in any combination. A single-board Linux computer keeps track of what probes are available, takes commands from ashore via Iridium satellite on what deployment schedule to follow, and records and forwards the probe data immediately with a time stamp and the GPS position. This paper provides a brief overview of its operation, capabilities, and some examples of how it is improving coverage along two lines in the Atlantic.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipInitial development of AXIS mechanical design elements wasmade possible by awards from the Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Technology Innovation Fund and the Sealark Foundation to the team of Dave Fratantoni, Keith von der Heydt (WHOI), and Terry Hammar (WHOI). Construction of the first full AXIS prototype was supported by a technology grant from the National Science Foundation (OCE-0926853) and the second one through an NSF-funded (OCE-1061185) subcontract from the University of Rhode Island.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/JTECH-D-17-0054.1
dc.subjectIn situ oceanic observationsen_US
dc.subjectInstrumentation/sensorsen_US
dc.subjectProfilers, oceanicen_US
dc.subjectShip observationsen_US
dc.titleAXIS—an Autonomous Expendable Instrument Systemen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2018-06-28en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JTECH-D-17-0054.1


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record