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dc.contributor.authorPolito, Michael J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHinke, Jefferson T.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHart, Tom  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSantos, Mercedes  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHoughton, Leah A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorThorrold, Simon R.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-23T16:27:13Z
dc.date.available2017-08-23T16:27:13Z
dc.date.issued2017-07
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/9186
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2017. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here under a nonexclusive, irrevocable, paid-up, worldwide license granted to WHOI. It is made available for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Biology Letters 13 (2017): 20170241, doi:10.1098/rsbl.2017.0241.en_US
dc.description.abstractIdentifying the at-sea distribution of wide ranging 20 marine predators is critical to understanding their ecology. Advances in electronic tracking devices and intrinsic biogeochemical markers have greatly improved our ability to track animal movements on ocean-wide scales. Here we show that, in combination with direct tracking, stable carbon isotope analysis of essential amino acids in tail feathers provides the ability to track the movement patterns of two, wide-ranging penguin species over ocean basin scales. In addition, we use this isotopic approach across multiple breeding colonies in the Scotia Arc to evaluate migration trends at a regional scale that would be logistically challenging using direct tracking alone.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunded by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation (GLS tags), Ocean Life Institute (M.J.P, L.H., S.R.T), Darwin Initiative (T.H.), and SeaWorld Bush Gardens Conservation Fund (M.J.P, S.R.T).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2017.0241
dc.subjectMigrationen_US
dc.subjectGeolocation (GLS)en_US
dc.subjectSeabirden_US
dc.subjectStable isotopesen_US
dc.titleStable isotope analyses of feather amino acids identify penguin migration strategies at ocean basin scalesen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US


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