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dc.contributor.authorAllen, Justine J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorAkkaynak, Derya  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSchnell, Alexandra K.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHanlon, Roger T.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-11T19:24:25Z
dc.date.available2018-05-02T08:44:39Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-02
dc.identifier.citationThe American Naturalist 190 (2017): 144-151en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/9093
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © University of Chicago Press, 2017. This article is posted here by permission of University of Chicago Press for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in The American Naturalist 190 (2017): 144-151, doi:10.1086/692009.en_US
dc.description.abstractMale cuttlefish compete for females with a repertoire of visually dramatic behaviors. Laboratory experiments have explored this system in Sepia officinalis, but corroborative field data have eluded collection attempts by many researchers. While scuba diving in Turkey, we fortuitously filmed an intense sequence of consort/intruder behaviors in which the consort lost and then regained his female mate from the intruder. These agonistic bouts escalated in stages, leading to fast dramatic expression of the elaborate intense zebra display and culminating in biting and inking as the intruder male attempted a forced copulation of the female. When analyzed in the context of game theory, the patterns of fighting behavior were more consistent with mutual assessment than self-assessment of fighting ability. Additional observations of these behaviors in nature are needed to conclusively determine which models best represent conflict resolution, but our field observations agree with laboratory findings and provide a valuable perspective.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipJ.J.A. was supported by a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship; A.K.S. was supported by a postdoctoral study grant from the Fyssen Foundation; R.T.H. was funded partly by the Sholley Foundation and supported by Office of Naval Research grant N0001406-1-0202.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Pressen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1086/692009
dc.subjectSepia officinalisen_US
dc.subjectAgonisticen_US
dc.subjectCephalopoden_US
dc.subjectBehavioren_US
dc.subjectSexual selectionen_US
dc.subjectEvolutionary game theoryen_US
dc.titleDramatic fighting by male cuttlefish for a female mateen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2018-05-02en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/692009


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