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dc.contributor.authorWheeler, Jeanette D.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Elaine  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHelfrich, Karl R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Erik J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorStarczak, Victoria R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMullineaux, Lauren S.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-28T18:07:05Z
dc.date.issued2017-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/9055
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2017. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here under a nonexclusive, irrevocable, paid-up, worldwide license granted to WHOI. It is made available for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Marine Ecology Progress Series 571 (2017): 109-120, doi:10.3354/meps12106.en_US
dc.description.abstractPlanktonic larvae of the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica are able to regulate their vertical position in the water, but the environmental cues responsible for this regulation, particularly in turbulent settings, remain unclear. We quantified swimming responses of late-stage oyster larvae in a grid-stirred turbulence tank to determine how light affects the swimming behavior of larvae over a range of hydrodynamic conditions similar to their natural coastal environments. We used particle image velocimetry and larval tracking to isolate larval swimming from local flow and to quantify 3 behavioral metrics: vertical swimming direction, proportion of larvae diving, and proportion of larvae swimming helically. We compared these metrics across turbulence levels ranging from still water (ε = 0 cm2 s-3) to estuarine-like conditions (ε = 0.4 cm2 s-3) in light and dark. At all turbulence levels, light had no effect on the proportion of upward swimming larvae, but elicited detectable increases in the proportion of helical swimming and diving behaviors. We further examined the effect of light and turbulence on specific characteristics of helical trajectories, and found that these environmental cues induce changes to both vertical and horizontal velocities of helically swimming larvae, changing the helix geometry. The increased prevalence of these behaviors in light likely plays an ecological role: increased diving in light (in conjunction with turbulence) is a potential mechanism to enhance settlement success, while changes to helical swimming in light may serve an anti-predatory function. Together, these behaviors provide insight into potentially complex larval responses to multiple simultaneous environmental cues.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding was provided by NSF grant OCE-0850419, NOAA Sea Grant NA14OAR4170074, grants from WHOI Coastal Ocean Institute, discretionary WHOI funds, a WHOI Ocean Life Fellowship to LM, a Grove City College Swezey Fund Grant to EA, and a WHOI Summer Student Fellowship to EL.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.3354/meps12106
dc.subjectLarval invertebrate ecologyen_US
dc.subjectLarval swimmingen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental cuesen_US
dc.subjectHydrodynamicsen_US
dc.titleLight stimulates swimming behavior of larval eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica in turbulent flowen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US


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