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dc.contributor.authorYu, Lisan  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorJin, Xiangze  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorJosey, Simon A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLee, Tong  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Arun  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWen, Caihong  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorXue, Yan  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-07T16:21:11Z
dc.date.available2017-11-02T08:38:36Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-02
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Climate 30 (2017): 3829-3852en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/9024
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Meteorological Society, 2017. This article is posted here by permission of American Meteorological Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Climate 30 (2017): 3829-3852, doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-16-0479.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study provides an assessment of the uncertainty in ocean surface (OS) freshwater budgets and variability using evaporation E and precipitation P from 10 atmospheric reanalyses, two combined satellite-based E − P products, and two observation-based salinity products. Three issues are examined: the uncertainty level in the OS freshwater budget in atmospheric reanalyses, the uncertainty structure and association with the global ocean wet/dry zones, and the potential of salinity in ascribing the uncertainty in E − P. The products agree on the global mean pattern but differ considerably in magnitude. The OS freshwater budgets are 129 ± 10 (8%) cm yr−1 for E, 118 ± 11 (9%) cm yr−1 for P, and 11 ± 4 (36%) cm yr−1 for E − P, where the mean and error represent the ensemble mean and one standard deviation of the ensemble spread. The E − P uncertainty exceeds the uncertainty in E and P by a factor of 4 or more. The large uncertainty is attributed to P in the tropical wet zone. Most reanalyses tend to produce a wider tropical rainband when compared to satellite products, with the exception of two recent reanalyses that implement an observation-based correction for the model-generated P over land. The disparity in the width and the extent of seasonal migrations of the tropical wet zone causes a large spread in P, implying that the tropical moist physics and the realism of tropical rainfall remain a key challenge. Satellite salinity appears feasible to evaluate the fidelity of E − P variability in three tropical areas, where the uncertainty diagnosis has a global indication.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPrimary support for the study is provided by the NOAAModeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections (MAPP) Program’s Climate Reanalysis Task Force (CRTF) through Grant NA13OAR4310106.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-16-0479.1
dc.subjectHydrologic cycleen_US
dc.subjectPrecipitationen_US
dc.subjectEvaporationen_US
dc.subjectSalinityen_US
dc.subjectWater budgeten_US
dc.subjectReanalysis dataen_US
dc.titleThe global ocean water cycle in atmospheric reanalysis, satellite, and ocean salinityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2017-11-02en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JCLI-D-16-0479.1


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