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dc.contributor.authorPrice, Allison A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Matthew G.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBlichert-Toft, Janne  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKurz, Mark D.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGill, James B.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBlusztajn, Jerzy S.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorJenner, Frances  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBrens, Raul  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorArculus, Richard J.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-11T19:29:43Z
dc.date.available2017-09-17T08:37:32Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-17
dc.identifier.citationGeochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 18 (2017): 1013–1042en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/8979
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2017. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 18 (2017): 1013–1042, doi:10.1002/2016GC006651.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe present new Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf-He isotopic data for 65 volcanic samples from the northern Lau and North Fiji Basins. This includes 47 lavas obtained from 40 dredge sites spanning an east-west transect across the Lau and North Fiji basins, 10 ocean island basalt (OIB)-type lavas collected from seven Fijian islands, and eight OIB lavas sampled on Rotuma. For the first time, we are able to map clear north-south and east-west geochemical gradients in 87Sr/86Sr across the northern Lau and North Fiji Basins: lavas with the most geochemically enriched radiogenic isotopic signatures are located in the northeast Lau Basin, while signatures of geochemical enrichment are diminished to the south and west away from the Samoan hot spot. Based on these geochemical patterns and plate reconstructions of the region, these observations are best explained by the addition of Samoa, Rurutu, and Rarotonga hot spot material over the past 4 Ma. We suggest that underplated Samoan material has been advected into the Lau Basin over the past ∼4 Ma. As the slab migrated west (and toward the Samoan plume) via rollback over time, younger and hotter (and therefore less viscous) underplated Samoan plume material was entrained. Thus, entrainment efficiency of underplated plume material was enhanced, and Samoan plume signatures in the Lau Basin became stronger as the trench approached the Samoan hot spot. The addition of subducted volcanoes from the Cook-Austral Volcanic Lineament first from the Rarotonga hot spot, then followed by the Rurutu hot spot, contributes to the extreme geochemical signatures observed in the northeast Lau Basin.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF Grant Number: EAR-1624840, EAR-1348082, and EAR-1347377; French Agence Nationale de la Recherche Grant Number: ANR-10-BLAN-0603en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2016GC006651
dc.subjectLau Basinen_US
dc.subjectGeochemistryen_US
dc.subjectSamoaen_US
dc.subjectNorth Fiji Basinen_US
dc.subjectHot spoten_US
dc.subjectCook-Australen_US
dc.titleGeodynamic implications for zonal and meridional isotopic patterns across the northern Lau and North Fiji Basinsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2017-09-17en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2016GC006651


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