Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWang, Zhaohui Aleck  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLawson, Gareth L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPilskaln, Cynthia H.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMaas, Amy E.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-05T20:07:09Z
dc.date.available2017-07-22T08:11:55Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-22
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 122 (2017): 372–389en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/8874
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2017. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 122 (2017): 372–389, doi:10.1002/2016JC012373.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Gulf of Maine (GoME) is a shelf region especially vulnerable to ocean acidification (OA) due to natural conditions of low pH and aragonite saturation states (Ω-Ar). This study is the first to assess the major oceanic processes controlling seasonal variability of the carbonate system and its linkages with pteropod abundance in Wilkinson Basin in the GoME. Two years of seasonal sampling cruises suggest that water-column carbonate chemistry in the region undergoes a seasonal cycle, wherein the annual cycle of stratification-overturn, primary production, respiration-remineralization and mixing all play important roles, at distinct spatiotemporal scales. Surface production was tightly coupled with remineralization in the benthic nepheloid layer during high production seasons, which results in occasional aragonite undersaturation. From spring to summer, carbonate chemistry in the surface across Wilkinson Basin reflects a transition from a production-respiration balanced system to a net autotropic system. Mean water-column Ω-Ar and abundance of large thecosomatous pteropods show some correlation, although patchiness and discrete cohort reproductive success likely also influence their abundance. Overall, photosynthesis-respiration is the primary driving force controlling Ω-Ar variability during the spring-to-summer transition as well as over the seasonal cycle. However, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) dissolution appears to occur near bottom in fall and winter when bottom water Ω-Ar is generally low but slightly above 1. This is accompanied by a decrease in pteropod abundance that is consistent with previous CaCO3 flux trap measurements. The region might experience persistent subsurface aragonite undersaturation in 30–40 years under continued ocean acidification.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCoastal Ocean Institute at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; National Science Foundation Grant Number: (OCE-1316040)en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2016JC012373
dc.subjectOcean acidificationen_US
dc.subjectCarbonate chemistryen_US
dc.subjectAragonite saturationen_US
dc.subjectPteropoden_US
dc.subjectGulf of Maineen_US
dc.subjectWilkinson Basinen_US
dc.titleSeasonal controls of aragonite saturation states in the Gulf of Maineen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2017-07-22en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2016JC012373


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record