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dc.contributor.authorTrujillo, Ernesto  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLeonard, Katherine  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMaksym, Ted  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLehning, Michael  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-28T21:05:27Z
dc.date.available2017-05-15T08:24:46Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-15
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface 121 (2016): 2172–2191en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/8755
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2016. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface 121 (2016): 2172–2191, doi:10.1002/2016JF003893.en_US
dc.description.abstractSnow distribution over sea ice is an important control on sea ice physical and biological processes. We combine measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer and blowing snow on an Antarctic sea ice floe with terrestrial laser scanning to characterize a typical storm and its influence on the spatial patterns of snow distribution at resolutions of 1–10 cm over an area of 100 m × 100 m. The pre-storm surface exhibits multidirectional elongated snow dunes formed behind aerodynamic obstacles. Newly deposited dunes are elongated parallel to the predominant wind direction during the storm. Snow erosion and deposition occur over 62% and 38% of the area, respectively. Snow deposition volume is more than twice that of erosion (351 m3 versus 158 m3), resulting in a modest increase of 2 ± 1 cm in mean snow depth, indicating a small net mass gain despite large mass relocation. Despite significant local snow depth changes due to deposition and erosion, the statistical distributions of elevation and the two-dimensional correlation functions remain similar to those of the pre-storm surface. Pre-storm and post-storm surfaces also exhibit spectral power law relationships with little change in spectral exponents. These observations suggest that for sea ice floes with mature snow cover features under conditions similar to those observed in this study, spatial statistics and scaling properties of snow surface morphology may be relatively invariant. Such an observation, if confirmed for other ice types and conditions, may be a useful tool for model parameterizations of the subgrid variability of sea ice surfaces.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAAD Science Grant Number: 4073; NSF Grant Numbers: OPP-1142075, EAR-0735156; NASA Grant Number: NNX15AC69G; Swiss National Science Foundationen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2016JF003893
dc.subjectLidaren_US
dc.subjectSea iceen_US
dc.subjectSnowen_US
dc.subjectSnow distributionen_US
dc.subjectBlowing snowen_US
dc.titleChanges in snow distribution and surface topography following a snowstorm on Antarctic sea iceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2017-05-15en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2016JF003893


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