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dc.contributor.authorPold, Grace  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBillings, Andrew F.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBlanchard, Jeffrey L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBurkhardt, Daniel B.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorFrey, Serita D.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMelillo, Jerry M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSchnabel, Julia  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorvan Diepen, Linda T. A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDeAngelis, Kristen M.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-20T19:51:08Z
dc.date.available2016-12-20T19:51:08Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-02
dc.identifier.citationApplied and Environmental Microbiology 82 (2016): 6518-6530en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/8606
dc.description© The Author(s), 2016. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology 82 (2016): 6518-6530, doi:10.1128/AEM.02012-16.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs Earth's climate warms, soil carbon pools and the microbial communities that process them may change, altering the way in which carbon is recycled in soil. In this study, we used a combination of metagenomics and bacterial cultivation to evaluate the hypothesis that experimentally raising soil temperatures by 5°C for 5, 8, or 20 years increased the potential for temperate forest soil microbial communities to degrade carbohydrates. Warming decreased the proportion of carbohydrate-degrading genes in the organic horizon derived from eukaryotes and increased the fraction of genes in the mineral soil associated with Actinobacteria in all studies. Genes associated with carbohydrate degradation increased in the organic horizon after 5 years of warming but had decreased in the organic horizon after warming the soil continuously for 20 years. However, a greater proportion of the 295 bacteria from 6 phyla (10 classes, 14 orders, and 34 families) isolated from heated plots in the 20-year experiment were able to depolymerize cellulose and xylan than bacterial isolates from control soils. Together, these findings indicate that the enrichment of bacteria capable of degrading carbohydrates could be important for accelerated carbon cycling in a warmer world.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work, including the efforts of Jeffrey Blanchard, Serita D. Frey, Jerry M. Melillo, and Kristen M. DeAngelis, was funded by National Science Foundation (NSF) (NSF 1237491, NSF 1456528, and ACI-1053575). This work, including the efforts of Jeffrey Blanchard, Serita D. Frey, Jerry M. Melillo, Linda T. A. van Diepen, and Kristen M. DeAngelis, was funded by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (DE-AC02-05CH11231). This work, including the efforts of Grace Pold, Andrew F. Billings, Jeffrey Blanchard, Jerry M. Melillo, and Kristen M. DeAngelis, was funded by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (DE-SC0010740).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiologyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02012-16
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleLong-term warming alters carbohydrate degradation potential in temperate forest soilsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/AEM.02012-16


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International