Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRypina, Irina I.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPratt, Lawrence J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLozier, M. Susan  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-01T19:26:34Z
dc.date.available2016-12-01T19:26:34Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-24
dc.identifier.citationLimnology and Oceanography 61 (2016): 1574–1588en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/8568
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, 2016. This article is posted here by permission of Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Limnology and Oceanography 61 (2016): 1574–1588, doi:10.1002/lno.10297.en_US
dc.description.abstractAmerican eel (Anguilla rostrata) complete their life cycle by migrating from the east coast of North America to Sargasso Sea, where they spawn planktonic eggs and dye. Larvae that develop from eggs need to return to North American coastal waters within the first year of life and are influenced by the oceanic currents during this journey. A coupled physical–biological model is used to investigate the extent to which inter-annual changes in the ocean circulation affect the success rates of larvae in reaching coastal nursery habitats. Our results suggest that natural oceanic variability can lead to changes in larval success rates by a factor of 2. Interannual variation in success rates are strongly affected by the Gulf Stream inertial overshoot events, with the largest success in years with an inertial overshoot and the smallest in years with a straighter and more southern configuration of the Gulf Stream downstream of Cape Hatteras. The mean Gulf Stream length and latitude between 75W and 70W longitude can be used as proxies for characterizing the overshoot events and can be converted into success rates using linear regression.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipI.I.R. and L.J.P. were supported by grant 85464100 (OCE-1154641) from the National Science Foundation. M.S.L. gratefully acknowledges support from the National Science Foundation.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/lno.10297
dc.titleInfluence of ocean circulation changes on the inter-annual variability of American eel larval dispersalen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/lno.10297


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record