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dc.contributor.authorHapke, Cheryl J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPlant, Nathaniel G.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, Rachel E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSchwab, William C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Timothy R.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-21T19:01:38Z
dc.date.available2016-11-21T19:01:38Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-24
dc.identifier.citationMarine Geology 381 (2016): 42–53en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/8538
dc.descriptionThis paper is not subject to U.S. copyright. The definitive version was published in Marine Geology 381 (2016): 42–53, doi:10.1016/j.margeo.2016.08.008.en_US
dc.description.abstractBehavior of coastal systems on time scales ranging from single storm events to years and decades is controlled by both small-scale sediment transport processes and large-scale geologic, oceanographic, and morphologic processes. Improved understanding of coastal behavior at multiple time scales is required for refining models that predict potential erosion hazards and for coastal management planning and decision-making. Here we investigate the primary controls on shoreline response along a geologically-variable barrier island on time scales resolving extreme storms and decadal variations over a period of nearly one century. An empirical orthogonal function analysis is applied to a time series of shoreline positions at Fire Island, NY to identify patterns of shoreline variance along the length of the island. We establish that there are separable patterns of shoreline behavior that represent response to oceanographic forcing as well as patterns that are not explained by this forcing. The dominant shoreline behavior occurs over large length scales in the form of alternating episodes of shoreline retreat and advance, presumably in response to storms cycles. Two secondary responses include long-term response that is correlated to known geologic variations of the island and the other reflects geomorphic patterns with medium length scale. Our study also includes the response to Hurricane Sandy and a period of post-storm recovery. It was expected that the impacts from Hurricane Sandy would disrupt long-term trends and spatial patterns. We found that the response to Sandy at Fire Island is not notable or distinguishable from several other large storms of the prior decade.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding for this research was provided by the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program and the USGS Natural Resource Preservation Program.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.margeo.2016.08.008
dc.subjectShoreline changeen_US
dc.subjectCoastal evolutionen_US
dc.subjectStorm responseen_US
dc.subjectEmpirical orthogonal functionen_US
dc.subjectFire Islanden_US
dc.titleDecoupling processes and scales of shoreline morphodynamicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.margeo.2016.08.008


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