Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPeucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWaters, Christine A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKurz, Mark D.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHoffman, Paul F.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-18T17:32:05Z
dc.date.available2016-11-18T17:32:05Z
dc.date.issued2015-08
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/8527
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2015. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Earth and Planetary Science Letters 437 (2016): 76-88, doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2015.12.040.en_US
dc.description.abstractHigh concentrations of extraterrestrial iridium have been reported in terminal Sturtian and Marinoan glacial marine sediments and are used to argue for long (likely 3-12 Myr) durations of these Cryogenian glaciations. Reanalysis of the Marinoan sedimentary rocks used in the original study, supplemented by sedimentary rocks from additional terminal Marinoan sections, however, does not confirm the initial report. New platinum group element concentrations, and 187Os/188Os and 3He/4He signatures are consistent with crustal origin and minimal extraterrestrial contributions. The discrepancy is likely caused by different sample masses used in the two studies, with this study being based on much larger samples that better capture the stochastic distribution of extraterrestrial particles in marine sediments. Strong enrichment of redox-sensitive elements, particularly rhenium, up-section in the basal postglacial cap carbonates, may indicate a return to more fully oxygenated seawater in the aftermath of the Marinoan snowball earth. Sections dominated by hydrogenous osmium indicate increasing submarine hydrothermal sources and/or continental inputs that are increasingly dominated by young mantle-derived rocks after deglaciation. Sedimentation rate estimates for the basal cap carbonates yield surprisingly slow rates of a few centimeters per thousand years. This study highlights the importance of using sedimentary rock samples that represent sufficiently large area-time products to properly sample extraterrestrial particles representatively, and demonstrates the value of using multiple tracers of extraterrestrial matter.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe are grateful for support from a 2008 WHOI Summer Student Fellowship for CAW. BPE acknowledges financial support from WHOI’s Ocean and Climate Change Institute (CH11320) and U.S. NSF SGER grant EAR-0821878. Fieldwork in NW Canada was licensed by the Aurora Research Institute and supported by a grant to PFH from the Astrobiology Institute of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Fieldwork in NW Canada and Namibia was supported by grants EAR-9905495 and EAR-0417422 (to PFH) from the US NSF. We thank Jon Husson (Harvard University) and Ricardo Trindade (University of São Paulo, Brazil) for excellent support during fieldwork in Namibia in August of 2005.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2015.12.040
dc.subjectSnowball earthen_US
dc.subjectOsmium isotopesen_US
dc.subjectIridiumen_US
dc.subjectHelium isotopesen_US
dc.subjectExtraterrestrial matteren_US
dc.subjectCap carbonateen_US
dc.titleNo evidence of extraterrestrial noble metal and helium anomalies at Marinoan glacial terminationen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record