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dc.contributor.authorZeiner, Carolyn A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPurvine, Samuel O.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZink, Erika M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPasa-Tolic, Ljiljana  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorChaput, Dominique L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHaridas, Sajeet  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWu, Si  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLaButti, Kurt  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGrigoriev, Igor V.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHenrissat, Bernard  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSantelli, Cara M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHansel, Colleen M.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-06T15:54:10Z
dc.date.available2016-10-06T15:54:10Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-19
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One 11 (2016): e0157844en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/8432
dc.descriptionThis is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose.en_US
dc.description.abstractFungal secretomes contain a wide range of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, and lignin-degrading accessory enzymes, that synergistically drive litter decomposition in the environment. While secretome studies of model organisms such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Aspergillus species have greatly expanded our knowledge of these enzymes, few have extended secretome characterization to environmental isolates or conducted side-by-side comparisons of diverse species. Thus, the mechanisms of carbon degradation by many ubiquitous soil fungi remain poorly understood. Here we use a combination of LC-MS/MS, genomic, and bioinformatic analyses to characterize and compare the protein composition of the secretomes of four recently isolated, cosmopolitan, Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycetes (Alternaria alternata SRC1lrK2f, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, and Paraconiothyrium sporulosum AP3s5-JAC2a). We demonstrate that the organisms produce a rich yet functionally similar suite of extracellular enzymes, with species-specific differences in secretome composition arising from unique amino acid sequences rather than overall protein function. Furthermore, we identify not only a wide range of carbohydrate-active enzymes that can directly oxidize recalcitrant carbon, but also an impressive suite of redox-active accessory enzymes that suggests a role for Fenton-based hydroxyl radical formation in indirect, non-specific lignocellulose attack. Our findings highlight the diverse oxidative capacity of these environmental isolates and enhance our understanding of the role of filamentous Ascomycetes in carbon turnover in the environment.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the National Science Foundation (www.nsf.gov), grant numbers EAR-1249489 and CBET-1336496, both awarded to CMH. Personal support for CAZ was also provided by Harvard University (www.harvard.edu) and by a Ford Foundation (www.fordfoundation.org) Predoctoral Fellowship administered by the National Academies.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0157844
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/*
dc.titleComparative analysis of secretome profiles of manganese(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungien_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0157844


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