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dc.contributor.authorFarrell, W. E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBerger, Jonathan  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBidlot, Jean-Raymond  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDzieciuch, Monika  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMunk, Walter H.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorStephen, Ralph A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWorcester, Peter F.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-30T18:29:38Z
dc.date.available2016-06-30T18:29:38Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-10
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Physical Oceanography 46 (2016): 1705-1716en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/8067
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Meteorological Society, 2016. This article is posted here by permission of American Meteorological Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Physical Oceanography 46 (2016): 1705-1716, doi:10.1175/JPO-D-15-0221.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractA rapid and broadband (1 h, 1 < f < 400 Hz) increase in pressure and vertical velocity on the deep ocean floor was observed on seven instruments comprising a 20-km array in the northeastern subtropical Pacific. The authors associate the jump with the passage of a cold front and focus on the 4- and 400-Hz spectra. At every station, the time of the jump is consistent with the front coming from the northwest. The apparent rate of progress, 10–20 km h−1 (2.8–5.6 m s−1), agrees with meteorological observations. The acoustic radiation below the front is modeled as arising from a moving half-plane of uncorrelated acoustic dipoles. The half-plane is preceded by a 10-km transition zone, over which the radiator strength increases linearly from zero. With this model, the time derivative of the jump at a station yields a second and independent estimate of the front’s speed, 8.5 km h−1 (2.4 m s−1). For the 4-Hz spectra, the source physics is taken to be Longuet-Higgins radiation. Its strength depends on the quantity , where Fζ is the wave amplitude power spectrum and I the overlap integral. Thus, the 1-h time constant observed in the bottom data implies a similar time constant for the growth of the wave field quantity behind the front. The spectra at 400 Hz have a similar time constant, but the jump occurs 25 min later. The implications of this difference for the source physics are uncertain.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe OBSANP cruise was funded by the Office of Naval Research under Grants N00014-10-1-0987, N00014-14-1-0324, N00014-10-1-0510, and N00014-10-1-0990.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/JPO-D-15-0221.1
dc.subjectAtm/Ocean Structure/ Phenomenaen_US
dc.subjectAtmosphere-ocean interactionen_US
dc.subjectCold frontsen_US
dc.subjectMarine boundary layeren_US
dc.subjectSea stateen_US
dc.titleWind sea behind a cold front and deep ocean acousticsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JPO-D-15-0221.1


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