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dc.contributor.authorBrin, Lindsay D.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGiblin, Anne E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRich, Jeremy J.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-02T19:46:47Z
dc.date.available2017-05-26T09:34:13Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-09
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/8034
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2016. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of John Wiley & Sons for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Global Change Biology 23 (2017): 331-340, doi:10.1111/gcb.13370.en_US
dc.description.abstractRemoval of biologically available nitrogen (N) by the microbially mediated processes denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) affects ecosystem N availability. Although few studies have examined temperature responses of denitrification and anammox, previous work suggests that denitrification could become more important than anammox in response to climate warming. To test this hypothesis, we determined whether temperature responses of denitrification and anammox differed in shelf and estuarine sediments from coastal Rhode Island over a seasonal cycle. The influence of temperature and organic C availability was further assessed in a 12-week laboratory microcosm experiment. Temperature responses, as characterized by thermal optima (Topt) and apparent activation energy (Ea), were determined by measuring potential rates of denitrification and anammox at 31 discrete temperatures ranging from 3 to 59°C. With a few exceptions, Topt and Ea of denitrification and anammox did not differ in Rhode Island sediments over the seasonal cycle. In microcosm sediments, Ea was somewhat lower for anammox compared to denitrification across all treatments. However, Topt did not differ between processes, and neither Ea nor Topt changed with warming or carbon addition. Thus, the two processes behaved similarly in terms of temperature response, and this response was not influenced by warming. This led us to reject the hypothesis that anammox is more cold-adapted than denitrification in our study system. Overall, our study suggests that temperature responses of both processes can be accurately modeled for temperate regions in the future using a single set of parameters, which are likely not to change over the next century as a result of predicted climate warming. We further conclude that climate warming will not directly alter the partitioning of N flow through anammox and denitrification.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. OCE-0852289 to JJR and OCE-0852263, OCE-0927400 and OCE1238212 to AEG, and Rhode Island Sea Grant to JJR.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.13370
dc.subjectDenitrificationen_US
dc.subjectAnammoxen_US
dc.subjectMarine sedimenten_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectTemperature dependenceen_US
dc.subjectActivation energyen_US
dc.titleSimilar temperature responses suggest future climate warming will not alter partitioning between denitrification and anammox in temperate marine sedimentsen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
dc.description.embargo2017-05-26en_US


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