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dc.contributor.authorDukhovskoy, Dmitry S.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMyers, Paul G.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPlatov, Gennady A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorTimmermans, Mary-Louise  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCurry, Beth  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorProshutinsky, Andrey  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBamber, Jonathan L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorChassignet, Eric P.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHu, Xianmin  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLee, Craig M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSomavilla, Raquel  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-31T17:52:09Z
dc.date.available2016-07-25T07:31:04Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-25
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 121 (2016): 877–907en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/7922
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2016. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 121 (2016): 877–907, doi:10.1002/2015JC011290.en_US
dc.description.abstractAccelerating since the early 1990s, the Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss exerts a significant impact on thermohaline processes in the sub-Arctic seas. Surplus freshwater discharge from Greenland since the 1990s, comparable in volume to the amount of freshwater present during the Great Salinity Anomaly events, could spread and accumulate in the sub-Arctic seas, influencing convective processes there. However, hydrographic observations in the Labrador Sea and the Nordic Seas, where the Greenland freshening signal might be expected to propagate, do not show a persistent freshening in the upper ocean during last two decades. This raises the question of where the surplus Greenland freshwater has propagated. In order to investigate the fate, pathways, and propagation rate of Greenland meltwater in the sub-Arctic seas, several numerical experiments using a passive tracer to track the spreading of Greenland freshwater have been conducted as a part of the Forum for Arctic Ocean Modeling and Observational Synthesis effort. The models show that Greenland freshwater propagates and accumulates in the sub-Arctic seas, although the models disagree on the amount of tracer propagation into the convective regions. Results highlight the differences in simulated physical mechanisms at play in different models and underscore the continued importance of intercomparison studies. It is estimated that surplus Greenland freshwater flux should have caused a salinity decrease by 0.06–0.08 in the sub-Arctic seas in contradiction with the recently observed salinification (by 0.15–0.2) in the region. It is surmised that the increasing salinity of Atlantic Water has obscured the freshening signal.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNSERC. Grant Numbers RGPIN 227438-09, RGPIN 04357 and RGPCC 433898; RFBR. Grant Number 13-05-00480, 14-05-00730, and 15-05-02457; NSF Grant Number: PLR-0804010, PLR-1313614, and PLR-1203720en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2015JC011290
dc.subjectGreenland Ice Sheet meltingen_US
dc.subjectGreenland freshwateren_US
dc.subjectThermohaline circulationen_US
dc.subjectNordic Seasen_US
dc.subjectSub-Arctic seasen_US
dc.subjectBaffin Bayen_US
dc.subjectLabrador Seaen_US
dc.titleGreenland freshwater pathways in the sub-Arctic Seas from model experiments with passive tracersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2016-07-25en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2015JC011290


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