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dc.contributor.authorBuchwald, Carolyn  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSantoro, Alyson E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorStanley, Rachel H. R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCasciotti, Karen L.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-26T19:01:30Z
dc.date.available2016-06-15T08:06:48Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-15
dc.identifier.citationGlobal Biogeochemical Cycles 29 (2015): 2061–2081en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/7809
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2015. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Global Biogeochemical Cycles 29 (2015): 2061–2081, doi:10.1002/2015GB005187.en_US
dc.description.abstractNitrite is a central intermediate in the marine nitrogen cycle and represents a critical juncture where nitrogen can be reduced to the less bioavailable N2 gas or oxidized to nitrate and retained in a more bioavailable form. We present an analysis of rates of microbial nitrogen transformations in the oxygen deficient zone (ODZ) within the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean (ETNP). We determined rates using a novel one-dimensional model using the distribution of nitrite and nitrate concentrations, along with their natural abundance nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotope profiles. We predict rate profiles for nitrate reduction, nitrite reduction, and nitrite oxidation throughout the ODZ, as well as the contributions of anammox to nitrite reduction and nitrite oxidation. Nitrate reduction occurs at a maximum rate of 25 nM d−1 at the top of the ODZ, at the same depth as the maximum rate of nitrite reduction, 15 nM d−1. Nitrite oxidation occurs at maximum rates of 10 nM d−1 above the secondary nitrite maximum, but also in the secondary nitrite maximum, within the ODZ. Anammox contributes to nitrite oxidation within the ODZ but cannot account for all of it. Nitrite oxidation within the ODZ that is not through anammox is also supported by microbial gene abundance profiles. Our results suggest the presence of nitrite oxidation within the ETNP ODZ, with implications for the distribution and physiology of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, and for total nitrogen loss in the largest marine ODZ.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation. Grant Numbers OCE 05-26277, OCE 09-610998; WHOI Coastal Ocean Instituteen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2015GB005187
dc.subjectNitriteen_US
dc.subjectNitrateen_US
dc.subjectStable isotopesen_US
dc.titleNitrogen cycling in the secondary nitrite maximum of the eastern tropical North Pacific off Costa Ricaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2016-06-15en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2015GB005187


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