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dc.contributor.authorTodd, Robert E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorOwens, W. Brechner  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRudnick, Daniel L.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-19T19:37:22Z
dc.date.available2016-07-01T08:37:16Z
dc.date.issued2016-01
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Physical Oceanography 46 (2016): 327–348en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/7795
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Meteorological Society, 2016. This article is posted here by permission of American Meteorological Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Physical Oceanography 46 (2016): 327–348, doi:10.1175/JPO-D-15-0112.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractPotential vorticity structure in two segments of the North Atlantic’s western boundary current is examined using concurrent, high-resolution measurements of hydrography and velocity from gliders. Spray gliders occupied 40 transects across the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico and 11 transects across the Gulf Stream downstream of Cape Hatteras. Cross-stream distributions of the Ertel potential vorticity and its components are calculated for each transect under the assumptions that all flow is in the direction of measured vertically averaged currents and that the flow is geostrophic. Mean cross-stream distributions of hydrographic properties, potential vorticity, and alongstream velocity are calculated for both the Loop Current and the detached Gulf Stream in both depth and density coordinates. Differences between these mean transects highlight the downstream changes in western boundary current structure. As the current increases its transport downstream, upper-layer potential vorticity is generally reduced because of the combined effects of increased anticyclonic relative vorticity, reduced stratification, and increased cross-stream density gradients. The only exception is within the 20-km-wide cyclonic flank of the Gulf Stream, where intense cyclonic relative vorticity results in more positive potential vorticity than in the Loop Current. Cross-stream gradients of mean potential vorticity satisfy necessary conditions for both barotropic and baroclinic instability within the western boundary current. Instances of very low or negative potential vorticity, which predispose the flow to various overturning instabilities, are observed in individual transects across both the Loop Current and the Gulf Stream.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipGlider operations in the Gulf Stream were supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant OCE-0220769. Glider operations in the Gulf of Mexico were supported by BP. R.E.T. was supported by the Penzance Endowed Fund in Support of Assistant Scientists and the Independent Research and Development Program at WHOI.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/JPO-D-15-0112.1
dc.subjectGeographic location/entityen_US
dc.subjectNorth Atlantic Oceanen_US
dc.subjectCirculation/ Dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectBoundary currentsen_US
dc.subjectPotential vorticityen_US
dc.subjectAtm/Ocean Structure/ Phenomenaen_US
dc.subjectBoundary currentsen_US
dc.titlePotential vorticity structure in the North Atlantic western boundary current from underwater glider observationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2016-07-01en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JPO-D-15-0112.1


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