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dc.contributor.authorArkhipova, Irina R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRice, Phoebe A.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-05T17:09:01Z
dc.date.available2016-11-30T09:42:32Z
dc.date.issued2015-11-30
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/7766
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2015. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of John Wiley & Sons for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Molecular Ecology 25 (2016): 1027-1031, doi:10.1111/mec.13543.en_US
dc.description.abstractMobile genetic elements (MGEs), also called transposable elements (TEs), represent universal components of most genomes and are intimately involved in nearly all aspects of genome organization, function, and evolution. However, there is currently a gap between fast-paced TE discovery in silico, stimulated by exponential growth of comparative genomic studies, and a limited number of experimental models amenable to more traditional in vitro and in vivo studies of structural, mechanistic, and regulatory properties of diverse MGEs. Experimental and computational scientists came together to bridge this gap at a recent conference, “Mobile Genetic Elements: in silico, in vitro, in vivo,” held at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, MA, USA.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipResearch in the authors’ laboratories is supported by NSF MCB-1121334 and NIH R01 GM111917 (I.A.), and by NIH R01 GM101989 and R21 AI117593 (P.R.)en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1111/mec.13543
dc.subjectTransposable elementsen_US
dc.subjectRetrotransposonsen_US
dc.subjectTranspositionen_US
dc.subjectGenomicsen_US
dc.subjectBioinformaticsen_US
dc.titleMobile genetic elements : in silico, in vitro, in vivoen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
dc.description.embargo2016-11-30en_US


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