Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWheeler, Jeanette D.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-01T16:51:54Z
dc.date.available2016-02-01T16:51:54Z
dc.date.issued2016-02
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/7756
dc.descriptionSubmitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution February 2016en_US
dc.description.abstractMany benthic marine invertebrates have two-phase life histories, relying on planktonic larval stages for dispersal and exchange of individuals between adult populations. Historically, larvae were considered passive drifters in prevailing ocean currents. More recently, however, the paradigm has shifted toward active larval behavior mediating transport in the water column. Larvae in the plankton encounter a variety of physical, chemical, and biological cues, and their behavioral responses to these cues may directly impact transport, survival, settlement, and successful recruitment. In this thesis, I investigated the effects of turbulence, light, and conspecific adult exudates on larval swimming behavior. I focused on two invertebrate species of distinct morphologies: the purple urchin Arbacia punctulata, which was studied in pre-settlement planktonic stages, and the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, which was studied in the competent-to-settle larval stage. From this work, I developed a conceptual framework within which larval behavior is understood as being driven simultaneously by external environmental cues and by larval age. As no a priori theory for larval behavior is derivable from first principles, it is only through experimental work that we are able to access behaviors and tie them back to specific environmental triggers. In this work, I studied the behavioral responses of larvae at the individual level, but those dynamics are likely playing out at larger scales in the ocean, impacting population connectivity, community structure, and resilience. In this way, my work represents progress in understanding how the ocean environment and larval behavior couple to influence marine ecological processes.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by the National Science Foundation under grant OCE-0850419 (to LS Mullineaux and KR Helfrich), by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Sea Grant NA14OAR4170074 (to LS Mullineaux, KR Helfrich, and JD Wheeler), grants from WHOI Coastal Ocean Institute, discretionary WHOI funds, a WHOI Ocean Life Fellowship (LS Mullineaux), and a Grove City College Swezey Fund Grant (EJ Anderson).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institutionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWHOI Thesesen_US
dc.subjectMarine invertebrates
dc.subjectLarvae
dc.titleBehavioral responses of invertebrate larvae to water column cuesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1575/1912/7756


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record