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dc.contributor.authorGerbi, Gregory P.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKastner, Samuel E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBrett, Genevieve  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-09T14:57:31Z
dc.date.available2016-02-01T09:28:23Z
dc.date.issued2015-08
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Physical Oceanography 45 (2015): 2006–2024en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/7518
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Meteorological Society, 2015. This article is posted here by permission of American Meteorological Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Physical Oceanography 45 (2015): 2006–2024, doi:10.1175/JPO-D-14-0234.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effects of wind-driven whitecapping on the evolution of the ocean surface boundary layer are examined using an idealized one-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes numerical model. Whitecapping is parameterized as a flux of turbulent kinetic energy through the sea surface and through an adjustment of the turbulent length scale. Simulations begin with a two-layer configuration and use a wind that ramps to a steady stress. This study finds that the boundary layer begins to thicken sooner in simulations with whitecapping than without because whitecapping introduces energy to the base of the boundary layer sooner than shear production does. Even in the presence of whitecapping, shear production becomes important for several hours, but then inertial oscillations cause shear production and whitecapping to alternate as the dominant energy sources for mixing. Details of these results are sensitive to initial and forcing conditions, particularly to the turbulent length scale imposed by breaking waves and the transfer velocity of energy from waves to turbulence. After 1–2 days of steady wind, the boundary layer in whitecapping simulations has thickened more than the boundary layer in simulations without whitecapping by about 10%–50%, depending on the forcing and initial conditions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Skidmore College for financial and infrastructure support, and Skidmore and the National Science Foundation for funding travel to meetings where early versions of this work were presented. We also thank the National Science Foundation, Oregon State University, Jonathan Nash, and Joe Jurisa for funding and hosting a workshop on River Plume Mixing in October, 2013, where ideas and context for this paper were developed.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/JPO-D-14-0234.1
dc.subjectCirculation/ Dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectMixingen_US
dc.subjectTurbulenceen_US
dc.subjectWave breakingen_US
dc.subjectWind stressen_US
dc.subjectAtm/Ocean Structure/ Phenomenaen_US
dc.subjectMixed layeren_US
dc.titleThe role of whitecapping in thickening the ocean surface boundary layeren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2016-02-01en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JPO-D-14-0234.1


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