Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSalanga, Matthew C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHorb, Marko E.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-18T13:46:37Z
dc.date.available2016-04-02T08:57:45Z
dc.date.issued2015-03
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/7462
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2015. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Springer for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Current Pathobiology Reports 3 (2015): 137-145, doi:10.1007/s40139-015-0076-0.en_US
dc.description.abstractDiseases affecting endodermal organs like the pancreas, lung and gastrointestinal (GI) tract have a substantial impact on human welfare. Since many of these are congenital defects that arise as a result of defects during development broad efforts are focused on understanding the development of these organs so as to better identify risk factors, disease mechanisms and therapeutic targets. Studies implementing model systems, like the amphibian Xenopus, have contributed immensely to our understanding of signaling (e.g. Wnt, FGF, BMP, RA) pathways and gene regulation (e.g. hhex, ptf1a, ngn3) that underlie normal development as well as disease progression. Recent advances in genome engineering further enhance the capabilities of the Xenopus model system for pursuing biomedical research, and will undoubtedly result in a boom of new information underlying disease mechanisms ultimately leading to advancements in diagnosis and therapy.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s40139-015-0076-0
dc.subjectXenopusen_US
dc.subjectEndodermen_US
dc.subjectLungen_US
dc.subjectGI tracten_US
dc.subjectDiabetesen_US
dc.subjectOocyteen_US
dc.subjectPancreasen_US
dc.titleXenopus as a model for GI/pancreas diseaseen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
dc.description.embargo2016-04-02en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record