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dc.contributor.authorMeyer, Amelie  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSloyan, Bernadette M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPolzin, Kurt L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Helen E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBindoff, Nathaniel L.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-13T18:45:27Z
dc.date.available2015-10-01T08:50:21Z
dc.date.issued2015-04
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Physical Oceanography 45 (2015): 966–987en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/7289
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Meteorological Society, 2015. This article is posted here by permission of American Meteorological Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Physical Oceanography 45 (2015): 966–987, doi:10.1175/JPO-D-14-0110.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractA key remaining challenge in oceanography is the understanding and parameterization of small-scale mixing. Evidence suggests that topographic features play a significant role in enhancing mixing in the Southern Ocean. This study uses 914 high-resolution hydrographic profiles from novel EM-APEX profiling floats to investigate turbulent mixing north of the Kerguelen Plateau, a major topographic feature in the Southern Ocean. A shear–strain finescale parameterization is applied to estimate diapycnal diffusivity in the upper 1600 m of the ocean. The indirect estimates of mixing match direct microstructure profiler observations made simultaneously. It is found that mixing intensities have strong spatial and temporal variability, ranging from O(10−6) to O(10−3) m2 s−1. This study identifies topographic roughness, current speed, and wind speed as the main factors controlling mixing intensity. Additionally, the authors find strong regional variability in mixing dynamics and enhanced mixing in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current frontal region. This enhanced mixing is attributed to dissipating internal waves generated by the interaction of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the topography of the Kerguelen Plateau. Extending the mixing observations from the Kerguelen region to the entire Southern Ocean, this study infers a large water mass transformation rate of 17 Sverdrups (Sv; 1 Sv ≡ 106 m3 s−1) across the boundary of Antarctic Intermediate Water and Upper Circumpolar Deep Water in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. This work suggests that the contribution of mixing to the Southern Ocean overturning circulation budget is particularly significant in fronts.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAM was supported by the joint CSIRO–University of Tasmania Quantitative Marine Science (QMS) program and the 2009 CSIRO Wealth from Ocean Flagship Collaborative Fund. BMS was supported by the Australian Climate Change Science Program, jointly funded by the Department of the Environment and CSIRO. KLPs salary support was provided by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution bridge support funds.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/JPO-D-14-0110.1
dc.subjectGeographic location/entityen_US
dc.subjectSouthern Oceanen_US
dc.subjectCirculation/ Dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectDiapycnal mixingen_US
dc.subjectFrontsen_US
dc.subjectOcean circulationen_US
dc.subjectTopographic effectsen_US
dc.subjectAtm/Ocean Structure/ Phenomenaen_US
dc.subjectMixingen_US
dc.titleMixing variability in the Southern Oceanen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2015-10-01en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JPO-D-14-0110.1


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