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dc.contributor.authorLi, Chun-Feng  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorXu, Xing  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLin, Jian  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSun, Zhen  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Jian  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorYao, Yongjian  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Xixi  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Qingsong  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKulhanek, Denise K.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWang, Jian  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSong, Taoran  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Junfeng  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorQiu, Ning  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yongxian  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Zhiyuan  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Trevor  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBao, Rui  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBriais, Anne  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Elizabeth A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorChen, Yifeng  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorClift, Peter D.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorColwell, Frederick S.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDadd, Kelsie A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDing, Weiwei  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorAlmeida, Ivan Hernandez  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Xiao-Long  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHyun, Sangmin  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Tao  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKoppers, Anthony A. P.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLi, Qianyu  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Chuanlian  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Zhifei  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorNagai, Renata H.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPeleo-Alampay, Alyssa  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSu, Xin  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorTejada, Maria Luisa G.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorTrinh, Hai Son  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorYeh, Yi-Ching  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Chuanlun  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Fan  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Guo-Liang  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-26T19:25:39Z
dc.date.available2015-06-27T09:09:12Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-27
dc.identifier.citationGeochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 15 (2014): 4958–4983en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/7180
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2014. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 15 (2014): 4958–4983, doi:10.1002/2014GC005567.en_US
dc.description.abstractCombined analyses of deep tow magnetic anomalies and International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 349 cores show that initial seafloor spreading started around 33 Ma in the northeastern South China Sea (SCS), but varied slightly by 1–2 Myr along the northern continent-ocean boundary (COB). A southward ridge jump of ∼20 km occurred around 23.6 Ma in the East Subbasin; this timing also slightly varied along the ridge and was coeval to the onset of seafloor spreading in the Southwest Subbasin, which propagated for about 400 km southwestward from ∼23.6 to ∼21.5 Ma. The terminal age of seafloor spreading is ∼15 Ma in the East Subbasin and ∼16 Ma in the Southwest Subbasin. The full spreading rate in the East Subbasin varied largely from ∼20 to ∼80 km/Myr, but mostly decreased with time except for the period between ∼26.0 Ma and the ridge jump (∼23.6 Ma), within which the rate was the fastest at ∼70 km/Myr on average. The spreading rates are not correlated, in most cases, to magnetic anomaly amplitudes that reflect basement magnetization contrasts. Shipboard magnetic measurements reveal at least one magnetic reversal in the top 100 m of basaltic layers, in addition to large vertical intensity variations. These complexities are caused by late-stage lava flows that are magnetized in a different polarity from the primary basaltic layer emplaced during the main phase of crustal accretion. Deep tow magnetic modeling also reveals this smearing in basement magnetizations by incorporating a contamination coefficient of 0.5, which partly alleviates the problem of assuming a magnetic blocking model of constant thickness and uniform magnetization. The primary contribution to magnetic anomalies of the SCS is not in the top 100 m of the igneous basement.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research is funded by National Science Foundation of China (grant 91028007, grant 91428309), Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, and Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (grant 20100072110036).en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2014GC005567
dc.subjectDeep tow magnetic surveyen_US
dc.subjectMagnetic anomalyen_US
dc.subjectCrustal evolutionen_US
dc.subjectModelingen_US
dc.subjectInternational Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 349en_US
dc.subjectSouth China Sea tectonicsen_US
dc.titleAges and magnetic structures of the South China Sea constrained by deep tow magnetic surveys and IODP Expedition 349en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2015-06-27en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2014GC005567


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