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dc.contributor.authorSundermeyer, Miles A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSkyllingstad, Eric D.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLedwell, James R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorConcannon, Brian  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorTerray, Eugene A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBirch, Daniel  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPierce, Stephen D.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCervantes, Brandy T. Kuebel  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-07T19:13:50Z
dc.date.available2015-05-06T09:07:41Z
dc.date.issued2014-11-06
dc.identifier.citationGeophysical Research Letters 41 (2014): 7584–7590en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/7020
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2014. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Geophysical Research Letters 41 (2014): 7584–7590, doi:10.1002/2014GL061637.en_US
dc.description.abstractTwo near-surface dye releases were mapped on scales of minutes to hours temporally, meters to order 1 km horizontally, and 1–20 m vertically using a scanning, depth-resolving airborne lidar. In both cases, dye evolved into a series of rolls with their major axes approximately aligned with the wind and/or near-surface current. In both cases, roll spacing was also of order 5–10 times the mixed layer depth, considerably larger than the 1–2 aspect ratio expected for Langmuir cells. Numerical large-eddy simulations under similar forcing showed similar features, even without Stokes drift forcing. In one case, inertial shear driven by light winds induced large aspect ratio large-eddy circulation. In the second, a preexisting lateral mixed layer density gradient provided the dominant forcing. In both cases, the growth of the large-eddy structures and the strength of the resulting dispersion were highly dependent on the type of forcing.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSupport for the 2004 field experiment was provided by the Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Technology Innovation Fund and Coastal Ocean Institute grant 27001545, both through Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and by Office of Naval Research grant N00014-01-1-0984. Support for the 2011 field experiments was provided by ONR grants N00014-09-1-0194, N00014-09-1-0175, N00014-11-WX-21010, N00014-12-WX-21031, and N00014-09-1-0460 and NSF grants OCE-0751734 and OCE-0751653. Simulations were supported under grant N00014-09-1-0268.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2014GL061637
dc.subjectLarge-eddy circulationen_US
dc.subjectOcean surface mixed layeren_US
dc.subjectLidaren_US
dc.subjectFluorescent dyeen_US
dc.subjectNumerical modelen_US
dc.titleObservations and numerical simulations of large-eddy circulation in the ocean surface mixed layeren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2015-05-06en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2014GL061637


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