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dc.contributor.authorLi, Yuanlong  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHan, Weiqing  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWilkin, John L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Weifeng G.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorArango, Hernan G.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZavala-Garay, Javier  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLevin, Julia C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCastruccio, Frederic S.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-07T16:37:10Z
dc.date.available2015-04-27T09:06:40Z
dc.date.issued2014-10-27
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 119 (2014): 7205–7228en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/7015
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2014. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 119 (2014): 7205–7228, doi:10.1002/2014JC010206.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe summertime eastward jet (SEJ) located around 12°N, 110°E–113°E, as the offshore extension of the Vietnam coastal current, is an important feature of the South China Sea (SCS) surface circulation in boreal summer. Analysis of satellite-derived sea level and sea surface wind data during 1992–2012 reveals pronounced interannual variations in its surface strength (SSEJ) and latitudinal position (YSEJ). In most of these years, the JAS (July, August, and September)-mean SSEJ fluctuates between 0.17 and 0.55 m s−1, while YSEJ shifts between 10.7°N and 14.3°N. These variations of the SEJ are predominantly contributed from the geostrophic current component that is linked to a meridional dipole pattern of sea level variations. This sea level dipole pattern is primarily induced by local wind changes within the SCS associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Enhanced (weakened) southwest monsoon at the developing (decaying) stage of an El Niño event causes a stronger (weaker) SEJ located south (north) of its mean position. Remote wind forcing from the tropical Pacific can also affect the sea level in the SCS via energy transmission through the Philippine archipelago, but its effect on the SEJ is small. The impact of the oceanic internal variability, such as eddy-current interaction, is assessed using an ocean general circulation model (OGCM). Such impact can lead to considerable year-to-year changes of sea level and the SEJ, equivalent to ∼20% of the observed variation. This implies the complexity and prediction difficulty of the upper ocean circulation in this region.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by the ONR grant N00014-12-1-03-23 and the NSF CAREER Award 0847605.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2014JC010206
dc.subjectSouth China Seaen_US
dc.subjectSea levelen_US
dc.subjectWind forcingen_US
dc.subjectENSOen_US
dc.titleInterannual variability of the surface summertime eastward jet in the South China Seaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2015-04-27en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2014JC010206


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