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dc.contributor.authorTortell, Philippe D.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorAsher, Elizabeth C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDucklow, Hugh W.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGoldman, Johanna A. L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDacey, John W. H.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGrzymski, Joseph J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Jodi N.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKranz, Sven A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBernard, Kim S.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMorel, Francois M. M.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-23T20:24:23Z
dc.date.available2015-04-03T09:06:28Z
dc.date.issued2014-10-03
dc.identifier.citationGeophysical Research Letters 41 (2014): 6803–6810en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/7009
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2014. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Geophysical Research Letters 41 (2014): 6803–6810, doi:10.1002/2014GL061266.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe use autonomous gas measurements to examine the metabolic balance (photosynthesis minus respiration) of coastal Antarctic waters during the spring/summer growth season. Our observations capture the development of a massive phytoplankton bloom and reveal striking variability in pCO2 and biological oxygen saturation (ΔO2/Ar) resulting from large shifts in community metabolism on time scales ranging from hours to weeks. Diel oscillations in surface gases are used to derive a high-resolution time series of net community production (NCP) that is consistent with 14C-based primary productivity estimates and with the observed seasonal evolution of phytoplankton biomass. A combination of physical mixing, grazing, and light availability appears to drive variability in coastal Antarctic NCP, leading to strong shifts between net autotrophy and heterotrophy on various time scales. Our approach provides insight into the metabolic responses of polar ocean ecosystems to environmental forcing and could be employed to autonomously detect climate-dependent changes in marine primary productivity.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by funds from the U.S. National Science Foundation (OPP awards ANT-0823101, ANT-1043559, ANT-1043593, and ANT-1043532) as well as support for PDT and ECA from the National Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2014GL061266
dc.subjectPhotosynthesisen_US
dc.subjectRespirationen_US
dc.subjectNet community productionen_US
dc.subjectDO2/Aren_US
dc.subjectCO2en_US
dc.subjectAntarcticaen_US
dc.titleMetabolic balance of coastal Antarctic waters revealed by autonomous pCO2 and ΔO2/Ar measurementsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2015-04-03en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2014GL061266


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