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dc.contributor.authorPonton, Camilo  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWest, A. Joshua  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorFeakins, Sarah J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGaly, Valier  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-23T19:49:17Z
dc.date.available2015-03-23T09:05:29Z
dc.date.issued2014-09-24
dc.identifier.citationGeophysical Research Letters 41 (2014): 6420–6427en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/7008
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2014. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Geophysical Research Letters 41 (2014): 6420–6427, doi:10.1002/2014GL061328.en_US
dc.description.abstractRivers carry organic molecules derived from terrestrial vegetation to sedimentary deposits in lakes and oceans, storing information about past climate and erosion, as well as representing a component of the carbon cycle. It is anticipated that sourcing of organic matter may not be uniform across catchments with substantial environmental variability in topography, vegetation zones, and climate. Here we analyze plant leaf wax biomarkers in transit in the Madre de Dios River (Peru), which drains a forested catchment across 4.5 km of elevation from the tropical montane forests of the Andes down into the rainforests of Amazonia. We find that the hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf wax molecules (specifically the C28 n-alkanoic acid) carried by this tropical mountain river largely records the elevation gradient defined by the isotopic composition of precipitation, and this supports the general interpretation of these biomarkers as proxy recorders of catchment conditions. However, we also find that leaf wax isotopic composition varies with river flow regime over storm and seasonal timescales, which could in some cases be quantitatively significant relative to changes in the isotopic composition of precipitation in the past. Our results inform on the sourcing and transport of material by a major tributary of the Amazon River and contribute to the spatial interpretation of sedimentary records of past climate using the leaf wax proxy.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation award 1227192 to A.J.W. and S.J.F. V.G. was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation award OCE-0928582.en_US
dc.format.mimetypetext/richtext
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/vnd.ms-excel
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2014GL061328
dc.subjectHydrogen isotopesen_US
dc.subjectBiomarkersen_US
dc.subjectFluvial transporten_US
dc.subjectErosionen_US
dc.subjectPaleoclimateen_US
dc.subjectAmazonen_US
dc.titleLeaf wax biomarkers in transit record river catchment compositionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2015-03-23en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2014GL061328


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