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dc.contributor.authorEdgcomb, Virginia P.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLeadbetter, Edward R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBourland, William A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBeaudoin, David J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBernhard, Joan M.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-16T19:36:02Z
dc.date.available2014-12-16T19:36:02Z
dc.date.issued2011-03-25
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Microbiology 2 (2011): 55en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6999
dc.description© The Author(s), 2011. This is an open-access article subject to an exclusive license agreement between the authors and Frontiers Media SA, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original authors and source are credited. The definitive version was published in Frontiers in Microbiology 2 (2011): 55, doi:10.3389/fmicb.2011.00055.en_US
dc.description.abstractMarine micro-oxic to sulfidic environments are sites of intensive biogeochemical cycling and elemental sequestration, where prokaryotes are major driving forces mediating carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus, and metal cycles, important from both biogeochemical and evolutionary perspectives. Associations between single-celled eukaryotes and bacteria and/or archaea are common in such habitats. Here we describe a ciliate common in the micro-oxic to anoxic, typically sulfidic, sediments of Santa Barbara Basin (CA, USA). The ciliate is 95% similar to Parduzcia orbis (18S rRNA). Transmission electron micrographs reveal clusters of at least three different endobiont types organized within membrane-bound sub-cellular regions. Catalyzed reporter deposition–fluorescent in situ hybridization and 16S rRNA clone libraries confirm the symbionts include up to two sulfate reducers (Desulfobulbaceae, Desulfobacteraceae), a methanogen (Methanobacteriales), and possibly a Bacteroidete (Cytophaga) and a Type I methanotroph, suggesting synergistic metabolisms in this environment. This case study is discussed in terms of implications to biogeochemistry, and benthic ecology.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by grants from NSF (MCB-0604084 to Virginia P. Edgcomb and Joan M. Bernhard and MCB-0702491 to Joan M. Bernhard, Virginia P. Edgcomb, and K. L. Casciotti).en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2011.00055
dc.subjectCiliateen_US
dc.subjectAnoxiaen_US
dc.subjectSymbiosisen_US
dc.subjectTEMen_US
dc.subjectSSU rRNAen_US
dc.subjectFISHen_US
dc.titleStructured multiple endosymbiosis of bacteria and archaea in a ciliate from marine sulfidic sediments : a survival mechanism in low oxygen, sulfidic sediments?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmicb.2011.00055


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