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dc.contributor.authorMeredith, Laura K.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRao, Deepa  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBosak, Tanja  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKlepac-Ceraj, Vanja  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorTada, Kendall R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHansel, Colleen M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorOno, Shuhei  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPrinn, Ronald G.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-04T19:52:22Z
dc.date.available2014-12-04T19:52:22Z
dc.date.issued2013-10
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6970
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2013. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Society for Applied Microbiology for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Environmental Microbiology Reports 6 (2014): 226-238, doi:10.1111/1758-2229.12116.en_US
dc.description.abstractMicrobe-mediated soil uptake is the largest and most uncertain variable in the budget of atmospheric hydrogen (H2). The diversity and ecophysiological role of soil microorganisms that can consume low atmospheric abundances of H2 with high-affinity [NiFe]-hydrogenases is unknown. We expanded the library of atmospheric H2-consuming strains to include four soil Harvard Forest Isolate (HFI) Streptomyces spp., Streptomyces cattleya, and Rhodococcus equi by assaying for high-affinity hydrogenase (hhyL) genes and quantifying H2 uptake rates. We find that aerial structures (hyphae and spores) are important for Streptomyces H2 consumption; uptake was not observed in Streptomyces griseoflavus Tu4000 (deficient in aerial structures) and was reduced by physical disruption of Streptomyces sp. HFI8 aerial structures. H2 consumption depended on the life cycle stage in developmentally distinct actinobacteria: Streptomyces sp. HFI8 (sporulating) and R. equi (non-sporulating, non-filamentous). Strain HFI8 took up H2 only after forming aerial hyphae and sporulating, while R. equi only consumed H2 in the late exponential and stationary phase. These observations suggest that conditions favoring H2 uptake by actinobacteria are associated with energy and nutrient limitation. Thus, H2 may be an important energy source for soil microorganisms inhabiting systems in which nutrients are frequently limited.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipL.K.M. was supported by from the following funding sources: NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, multiple grants from NASA to MIT for the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE), MIT Center for Global Change Science, MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, MIT Martin Family Society of Fellows for Sustainability, MIT Ally of Nature Research Fund, MIT William Otis Crosby Lectureship, and MIT Warren Klein Fund. D. R. was funded through MIT Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) with support from the Lord Foundation and Jordan J. Baruch Fund (1947) and was supported by the Harvard Forest REU Program.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1111/1758-2229.12116
dc.titleConsumption of atmospheric hydrogen during the life cycle of soil-dwelling actinobacteriaen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US


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