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dc.contributor.authorXu, Yuan  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorVick-Majors, Trista  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMorgan-Kiss, Rachael  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPriscu, John C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorAmaral-Zettler, Linda A.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-25T18:32:30Z
dc.date.available2014-11-25T18:32:30Z
dc.date.issued2014-10-01
dc.identifier.citationBiological Bulletin 227 (2014): 175-190en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6965
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Marine Biological Laboratory, 2014. This article is posted here by permission of Marine Biological Laboratory for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Biological Bulletin 227 (2014): 175-190.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe report an in-depth survey of next-generation DNA sequencing of ciliate diversity and community structure in two permanently ice-covered McMurdo Dry Valley lakes during the austral summer and autumn (November 2007 and March 2008). We tested hypotheses on the relationship between species richness and environmental conditions including environmental extremes, nutrient status, and day length. On the basis of the unique environment that exists in these high-latitude lakes, we expected that novel taxa would be present. Alpha diversity analyses showed that extreme conditions—that is, high salinity, low oxygen, and extreme changes in day length—did not impact ciliate richness; however, ciliate richness was 30% higher in samples with higher dissolved organic matter. Beta diversity analyses revealed that ciliate communities clustered by dissolved oxygen, depth, and salinity, but not by season (i.e., day length). The permutational analysis of variance test indicated that depth, dissolved oxygen, and salinity had significant influences on the ciliate community for the abundance matrices of resampled data, while lake and season were not significant. This result suggests that the vertical trends in dissolved oxygen concentration and salinity may play a critical role in structuring ciliate communities. A PCR-based strategy capitalizing on divergent eukaryotic V9 hypervariable region ribosomal RNA gene targets unveiled two new genera in these lakes. A novel taxon belonging to an unknown class most closely related to Cryptocaryon irritans was also inferred from separate gene phylogenies.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding was provided by NSF DEB-0717390 to Linda Amaral-Zettler (MIRADA-LTERS); OPP-1115245, OPP-0838933, OPP-1027284, and OPP-0839075 to John C. Priscu; and OPP-0631659 and OPP-1056396 to Rachael Morgan-Kiss. We would also like to acknowledge the China Scholarship Council (No. [2012] 3013) for fellowship support to Yuan Xu enabling her to study at the Marine Biological Laboratory. The Montana Space Grant Consortium provided additional funding for Trista Vick-Majors.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMarine Biological Laboratoryen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1086/BBLv227n2p175
dc.titleCiliate diversity, community structure, and novel taxa in lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarcticaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/BBLv227n2p175


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