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dc.contributor.authorNewby, Paige E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorShuman, Bryan N.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Jeffrey P.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKarnauskas, Kristopher B.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMarsicek, Jeremiah  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-22T18:43:30Z
dc.date.available2014-12-25T10:13:23Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-25
dc.identifier.citationGeophysical Research Letters 41 (2014): 4300–4307en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6858
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2014. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Geophysical Research Letters 41 (2014): 4300–4307, doi:10.1002/2014GL060183.en_US
dc.description.abstractGeophysical and sedimentary records from five lakes in Massachusetts reveal regionally coherent hydrologic variability during the Holocene. All of the lakes have risen since ~9.0 ka, but multicentury droughts after 5.6 ka repeatedly lowered their water levels. Quantified water level histories from the three best-studied lakes share >70% of their reconstructed variance. Four prominent low-water phases at 4.9–4.6, 4.2–3.9, 2.9–2.1, and 1.3–1.2 ka were synchronous across coastal lakes, even after accounting for age uncertainties. The droughts also affected sites up to ~200 km inland, but water level changes at 5.6–4.9 ka appear out of phase between inland and coastal lakes. During the enhanced multicentury variability after ~5.6 ka, droughts coincided with cooling in Greenland and may indicate circulation changes across the North Atlantic region. Overall, the records demonstrate that current water levels are exceptionally high and confirm the sensitivity of water resources in the northeast U.S. to climate change.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe National Science Foundation (EAR-0602408, EAR- 1036191, and DEB-0816731 to Shuman; EAR-0602380 to Donnelly) and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Ocean and Climate Change Institute (Donnelly) funded this research.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2014GL060183
dc.subjectHoloceneen_US
dc.subjectPaleohydrologyen_US
dc.subjectNortheast U.S.en_US
dc.subjectGround-penetrating radaren_US
dc.subjectLake levelsen_US
dc.subjectDroughten_US
dc.titleCentennial-to-millennial hydrologic trends and variability along the North Atlantic Coast, USA, during the Holoceneen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2014-12-25en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2014GL060183


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