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dc.contributor.authorArzeno, Isabella B.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBeardsley, Robert C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLimeburner, Richard  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorOwens, W. Brechner  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPadman, Laurie  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSpringer, Scott R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Craig L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Michael J. M.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-18T19:10:40Z
dc.date.available2015-01-09T10:02:39Z
dc.date.issued2014-07-09
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 119 (2014): 4214–4233en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6847
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2014. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 119 (2014): 4214–4233, doi:10.1002/2014JC009792.en_US
dc.description.abstractBasal melting of ice shelves is an important, but poorly understood, cause of Antarctic ice sheet mass loss and freshwater production. We use data from two moorings deployed through Ross Ice Shelf, ∼6 and ∼16 km south of the ice front east of Ross Island, and numerical models to show how the basal melting rate near the ice front depends on sub-ice-shelf ocean variability. The moorings measured water velocity, conductivity, and temperature for ∼2 months starting in late November 2010. About half of the current velocity variance was due to tides, predominantly diurnal components, with the remainder due to subtidal oscillations with periods of a few days. Subtidal variability was dominated by barotropic currents that were large until mid-December and significantly reduced afterward. Subtidal currents were correlated between moorings but uncorrelated with local winds, suggesting the presence of waves or eddies that may be associated with the abrupt change in water column thickness and strong hydrographic gradients at the ice front. Estimated melt rate was ∼1.2 ± 0.5 m a−1 at each site during the deployment period, consistent with measured trends in ice surface elevation from GPS time series. The models predicted similar annual-averaged melt rates with a strong annual cycle related to seasonal provision of warm water to the ice base. These results show that accurately modeling the high spatial and temporal ocean variability close to the ice-shelf front is critical to predicting time-dependent and mean values of meltwater production and ice-shelf thinning.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) participation in the ANDRILL Coulman High Program was supported by the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs (NSF ANT-0839108) through a subcontract from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln (UNL 25-0550-0004-004). I. Arzeno was supported as a 2011 WHOI Summer Student Fellow through the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates program (OCE- 0649139). L. Padman and S. Springer were supported by NASA grant NNX10AG19G to Earth & Space Research (ESR). M. Williams and C. Stewart were supported by the New Zealand National Institute of Water and Atmosphere (NIWA) core funding under the National Climate Centre, and the Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment (Contract CO5X1001).en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2014JC009792
dc.subjectArctic and Antarctic oceanographyen_US
dc.subjectIce shelvesen_US
dc.titleOcean variability contributing to basal melt rate near the ice front of Ross Ice Shelf, Antarcticaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2015-01-09en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2014JC009792


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