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dc.contributor.authorMasterson, John P.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorFienen, Michael N.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorThieler, E. Robert  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGesch, Dean B.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGutierrez, Benjamin T.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPlant, Nathaniel G.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-25T19:09:34Z
dc.date.available2014-07-25T19:09:34Z
dc.date.issued2014-11-12
dc.identifier.citationEcohydrology 7 (2014): 1064–1071en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6750
dc.descriptionThis paper is not subject to U.S. copyright. The definitive version was published in Ecohydrology 7 (2014): 1064–1071, doi:10.1002/eco.1442.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe used a numerical model to investigate how a barrier island groundwater system responds to increases of up to 60 cm in sea level. We found that a sea-level rise of 20 cm leads to substantial changes in the depth of the water table and the extent and depth of saltwater intrusion, which are key determinants in the establishment, distribution and succession of vegetation assemblages and habitat suitability in barrier islands ecosystems. In our simulations, increases in water-table height in areas with a shallow depth to water (or thin vadose zone) resulted in extensive groundwater inundation of land surface and a thinning of the underlying freshwater lens. We demonstrated the interdependence of the groundwater response to island morphology by evaluating changes at three sites. This interdependence can have a profound effect on ecosystem composition in these fragile coastal landscapes under long-term changing climatic conditions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe used a numerical model to investigate how a barrier island groundwater system responds to increases of up to 60 cm in sea level. We found that a sea-level rise of 20 cm leads to substantial changes in the depth of the water table and the extent and depth of saltwater intrusion, which are key determinants in the establishment, distribution and succession of vegetation assemblages and habitat suitability in barrier islands ecosystems. In our simulations, increases in water-table height in areas with a shallow depth to water (or thin vadose zone) resulted in extensive groundwater inundation of land surface and a thinning of the underlying freshwater lens. We demonstrated the interdependence of the groundwater response to island morphology by evaluating changes at three sites. This interdependence can have a profound effect on ecosystem composition in these fragile coastal landscapes under long-term changing climatic conditions. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/eco.1442
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/*
dc.subjectGroundwateren_US
dc.subjectBarrier islandsen_US
dc.subjectSea-level riseen_US
dc.subjectVadose zoneen_US
dc.subjectSalinityen_US
dc.subjectEcohydrologyen_US
dc.subjectVegetation distributionen_US
dc.titleEffects of sea-level rise on barrier island groundwater system dynamics – ecohydrological implicationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/eco.1442


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