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dc.contributor.authorGodin, Oleg A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZabotin, Nikolay A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSheehan, Anne F.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCollins, John A.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-08T19:05:16Z
dc.date.available2014-10-22T08:57:25Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-18
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 119 (2014): 1103-1122en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6728
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2014. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 119 (2014): 1103-1122, doi:10.1002/2013JC009395.en_US
dc.description.abstractWave interferometry is a remote sensing technique, which is increasingly employed in helioseismology, seismology, and acoustics to retrieve parameters of the propagation medium from two-point cross-correlation functions of random wavefields. Here we apply interferometry to yearlong records of seafloor pressure at 28 locations off New Zealand's South Island to investigate propagation and directivity properties of infragravity waves away from shore. A compressed cross-correlation function technique is proposed to make the interferometry of dispersive waves more robust, decrease the necessary noise averaging time, and simplify retrieval of quantitative information from noise cross correlations. The emergence of deterministic wave arrivals from cross correlations of random wavefields is observed up to the maximum range of 692 km between the pressure sensors in the array. Free, linear waves with a strongly anisotropic distribution of power flux density are found to be dominant in the infragravity wavefield. Lowest-frequency components of the infragravity wavefield are largely isotropic. The anisotropy has its maximum in the middle of the spectral band and decreases at the high-frequency end of the spectrum. Highest anisotropy peaks correspond to waves coming from portions of the New Zealand's shoreline. Significant contributions are also observed from waves propagating along the coastline and probably coming from powerful sources in the northeast Pacific. Infragravity wave directivity is markedly different to the east and to the west of the South Island. The northwest coast of the South Island is found to be a net source of the infragravity wave energy.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe collection of DPG data was supported by the National Science Foundation Continental Dynamics program under grants EAR-0409564, EAR-0409609, and EAR-0409835. This work was supported, in part, by the University of Colorado Seed Grant ‘‘Study of Ocean Infragravity Waves with a Large Array of Seafloor Seismometers,’’ the National Science Foundation award OCE 1129524, and the Office of Naval Research award N00014-13-1–0348.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2013JC009395
dc.subjectSurface gravity wavesen_US
dc.subjectWave interferometryen_US
dc.subjectDeep oceanen_US
dc.subjectRandom wave fieldsen_US
dc.titleInterferometry of infragravity waves off New Zealanden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2014-08-18en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2013JC009395


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