Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorNeumann, Rebecca B.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCardon, Zoe G.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorTeshera-Levye, Jennifer  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRockwell, Fulton E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZwieniecki, Maciej A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHolbrook, N. Michele  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-07T18:12:31Z
dc.date.available2014-10-24T08:58:56Z
dc.date.issued2013-09
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6724
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2013. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of John Wiley & Sons for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Plant, Cell & Environment 37 (2014): 899-910, doi:10.1111/pce.12206.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe movement of water from moist to dry soil layers through the root systems of plants, referred to as hydraulic redistribution (HR), occurs throughout the world and is thought to influence carbon and water budgets and ecosystem functioning. The realized hydrologic, biogeochemical, and ecological consequences of HR depend on the amount of redistributed water, while the ability to assess these impacts requires models that correctly capture HR magnitude and timing. Using several soil types and two eco-types of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in split-pot experiments, we examined how well the widely used HR modeling formulation developed by Ryel et al. (2002) matched experimental determination of HR across a range of water potential driving gradients. H. annuus carries out extensive nighttime transpiration, and though over the last decade it has become more widely recognized that nighttime transpiration occurs in multiple species and many ecosystems, the original Ryel et al. (2002) formulation does not include the effect of nighttime transpiration on HR. We developed and added a representation of nighttime transpiration into the formulation, and only then was the model able to capture the dynamics and magnitude of HR we observed as soils dried and nighttime stomatal behavior changed, both influencing HR.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by a NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellowship to RBN, administered by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to NMH, and by DOE Terrestrial Ecosystem Science grant ER65389 to ZGC and RBN.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1111/pce.12206
dc.subjectHydraulic redistributionen_US
dc.subjectHydraulic liften_US
dc.subjectHelianthus annuusen_US
dc.subjectSunfloweren_US
dc.subjectNighttime transpirationen_US
dc.subjectSoil textureen_US
dc.titleModelled hydraulic redistribution by sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) matches observed data only after including night-time transpirationen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
dc.description.embargo2014-10-24en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record