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dc.contributor.authorLorenzo-Trueba, Jorge  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorAshton, Andrew D.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-27T18:13:21Z
dc.date.available2014-10-22T08:57:25Z
dc.date.issued2014-04-07
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface 119 (2014): 779–801en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6714
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2014. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface 119 (2014): 779–801, doi:10.1002/2013JF002941.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe construct a simple morphodynamic model to investigate the long-term dynamic evolution of a coastal barrier system experiencing sea-level rise. Using a simplified barrier geometry, the model includes a dynamic shoreface profile that can be out of equilibrium and explicitly treats barrier sediment overwash as a flux. With barrier behavior primarily controlled by the maximum potential overwash flux and the rate of shoreface response, the modeled barrier system demonstrates four primary behaviors: height drowning, width drowning, constant landward retreat, and a periodic retreat. Height drowning occurs when overwash fluxes are insufficient to maintain the landward migration rate required to keep pace with sea-level rise. On the other hand, width drowning occurs when the shoreface response rate is insufficient to maintain the barrier geometry during overwash-driven landward migration. During periodic barrier retreat, the barrier experiences oscillating periods of rapid overwash followed by periods of relative stability as the shoreface resteepens. This periodic retreat, which occurs even with a constant sea-level rise rate, arises when overwash rates and shoreface response rates are large and of similar magnitude. We explore the occurrence of these behaviors across a wide range of parameter values and find that in addition to the maximum overwash flux and the shoreface response rate, barrier response can be particularly sensitive to the sea-level rise rate and back-barrier lagoon slope. Overall, our findings contrast with previous research which has primarily associated complex barrier behavior with changes in external forcing such as sea-level rise rate, sediment supply, or back-barrier geometry.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research has been supported by the National Science Foundation grant #CNH-0815875, the Strategic Environment Research and Development Program, and the Coastal Ocean Institute of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeimage/gif
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2013JF002941
dc.subjectBarrier Evolutionen_US
dc.subjectSea-level riseen_US
dc.subjectShoreface Dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectBarrier Drowningen_US
dc.subjectDiscontinuous Retreaten_US
dc.subjectRolloveren_US
dc.titleRollover, drowning, and discontinuous retreat: Distinct modes of barrier response to sea-level rise arising from a simple morphodynamic modelen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2014-10-07en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2013JF002941


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