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dc.contributor.authorPontbriand, Claire W.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSohn, Robert A.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-20T18:49:15Z
dc.date.available2014-10-22T08:57:25Z
dc.date.issued2014-03-19
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth 119 (2014): 822–839en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6705
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2014. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth 119 (2014): 822–839, doi:10.1002/2013JB010110.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe detected 32,078 very small, local microearthquakes (average ML = −1) during a 9 month deployment of five ocean bottom seismometers on the periphery of the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse active mound. Seismicity rates were constant without any main shock-aftershock behavior at ~243 events per day at the beginning of the experiment, 128 events per day after an instrument failed, and 97 events per day at the end of the experiment when whale calls increased background noise levels. The microearthquake seismograms are characterized by durations of <1 s and most have single-phase P wave arrivals (i.e., no S arrivals). We accurately located 6207 of the earthquakes, with hypocenters clustered within a narrow depth interval from ~50 to 125 m below seafloor on the south and west flanks of the deposit. We model the microearthquakes as reaction-driven fracturing events caused by anhydrite deposition in the secondary circulation system of the hydrothermal mound and show that under reasonable modeling assumptions an average event represents a volume increase of 31–58 cm3, yielding an annual (seismogenic) anhydrite deposition rate of 27–51 m3.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported in part by the U.S. National Science Foundation, National Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship, and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Deep Ocean Exploration Institute.en_US
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/postscript
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2013JB010110
dc.subjectHydrothermalen_US
dc.subjectMicroearthquakeen_US
dc.subjectSulfideen_US
dc.subjectCirculationen_US
dc.subjectRechargeen_US
dc.titleMicroearthquake evidence for reaction-driven cracking within the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse active hydrothermal depositen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2014-09-19en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2013JB010110


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