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dc.contributor.authorFurby, Kathryn A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorApprill, Amy  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCervino, James M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorOssolinski, Justin E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHughen, Konrad A.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-28T17:52:42Z
dc.date.available2014-05-28T17:52:42Z
dc.date.issued2014-03
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6679
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2014. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Elsevier for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Marine Environmental Research 98 (2014): 29-38, doi:10.1016/j.marenvres.2014.04.002.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs sea surface temperatures rise and the global human population increases, large-scale field observations of marine organism health and water quality are increasingly necessary. We investigated the health of corals from the family Fungiidae using visual observations in relation to water quality and microbial biogeochemistry parameters along 1300 km of the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia. At large scales, incidence of lesions caused by unidentified etiology showed consistent signs, increasing significantly from the northern to southern coast and positively correlated to annual mean seawater temperatures. Lesion abundance also increased to a maximum of 96% near the populous city of Jeddah. The presence of lesioned corals in the region surrounding Jeddah was strongly correlated with elevated concentrations of ammonium and changes in microbial communities that are linked to decreased water quality. This study suggests that both high seawater temperatures and nutrient pollution may play an indirect role in the formation of lesions on corals.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by Award No. USA 00002 to K. Hughen by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and a WHOI Ocean Life Institute postdoctoral scholar fellowship to A. Apprill.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.marenvres.2014.04.002
dc.subjectScleractiniaen_US
dc.subjectSaudi Arabiaen_US
dc.subjectMicrobesen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectMarine ecologyen_US
dc.subjectNutrientsen_US
dc.titleIncidence of lesions on Fungiidae corals in the eastern Red Sea is related to water temperature and coastal pollutionen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US


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