Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBatchelder, Harold P.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDaly, Kendra L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Cabell S.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorJi, Rubao  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorOhman, Mark D.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, William T.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRunge, Jeffrey A.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-24T13:42:15Z
dc.date.available2014-04-24T13:42:15Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.citationOceanography 26, no. 4 (2013): 34–51en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6579
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Oceanography Society, 2013. This article is posted here by permission of The Oceanography Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Oceanography 26, no. 4 (2013): 34–51, doi:10.5670/oceanog.2013.74.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe 20-year US GLOBEC (Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics) program examined zooplankton populations and their predators in four coastal marine ecosystems. Program scientists learned that environmental controls on zooplankton vital rates, especially the timing and magnitude of reproduction, growth, life-cycle progression, and mortality, determine species population dynamics, seasonal and spatial distributions, and abundances. Improved knowledge of spatial-temporal abundance and distribution of individual zooplankton taxa coupled with new information linking higher trophic level predators (salmon, cod, haddock, penguins, seals) to their prey yielded mechanistic descriptions of how climate variation impacts regionally important marine resources. Coupled ecological models driven by improved regional-scale climate scenario models developed during GLOBEC enable forecasts of plausible future conditions in coastal ecosystems, and will aid and inform decision makers and communities as they assess, respond, and adapt to the effects of environmental change. Multi-region synthesis revealed that conditions in winter, before upwelling, or seasonal stratification, or ice melt (depending on region) had significant and important effects that primed the systems for greater zooplankton population abundance and productivity the following spring-summer, with effects that propagated to higher trophic levels.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFor support in the preparation of this manuscript, HPB and WTP acknowledge OCE-0816358; KLD acknowledges OPP-9910610, OPP-0196489, and OCE-0814405; CSD and RJ acknowledge NA17RJ1223 and OCE-0815838; MDO acknowledges the California Current Ecosystem LTER site; and JAR acknowledges OCE-1235920.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/vnd.ms-excel
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe Oceanography Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2013.74
dc.titleClimate impacts on zooplankton population dynamics in coastal marine ecosystemsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.5670/oceanog.2013.74


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record